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Client not visible error (-1028) - changed IP address


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I backup 4 Mac OS X clients to a 5th Mac OS X machine. After a recent power outage the IP addresses of most machines changed. One of the clients is no longer recognised by the backup machine. From the backup machine it can be seen when I browse to it, and if I test the new IP address it responds correctly with "found client at IP ...". However when I try to configure the client from the backup machine, or run a backup, it searches only for the OLD address which of course it can't find, and fails. Is there any way I can force it to look for the proper IP address?

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How did you originally set up the client? If you did it via "Add by address," you will need to forget and re-add the client.

 

If you used subnet broadcast, be sure that the current subnet is included in the list of subnets to be searched.

 

If you used the default, multicast, Retrospect should be able to connect. If it doesn't, forgetting and re-adding the client may help.

 

If all else fails, you may need to uninstall and reinstall the client software on the client machine. Be sure to use the latest client version (currently 6.1.130).

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How did you originally set up the client? ..... If you used the default, multicast, Retrospect should be able to connect. If it doesn't, forgetting and re-adding the client may help.

 


Thanks for the advice.

 

I would have used the default because I don't know enough to have done it any other way. I was really hoping to avoid forgetting and re-adding because last time I did this (for other reasons) it had to re-backup the whole of that client's data, which takes much unnecessary time and media. However if there is no alternative I'll bite the bullet.

 

Thanks also to rhwalker for the static IP suggestion. I would love to have a static IP for several reasons but as far as I can tell our IP addresses are set by our cable ISP who insists that they are unable to provide static IP unless I downgrade to an ADSL connection.

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>last time I did this (for other reasons) it had to re-backup the whole of that client's data, which

> takes much unnecessary time and media.

 

While forgetting a client will require you to re-configure any scripts that had been using that client as a Source, any data on the Source that is already on the Backup Set will not have to be copied over again. That's how Retrospect's Matching technology works. There must have been some other consideration along with the other reason.

 

>I would love to have a static IP for several reasons but as far as I can tell our IP addresses

>are set by our cable ISP

 

Don't confuse "Static IP" with "Routable IP." The suggestion was to force your router to "dynamically" assign the same address to the same machine each time, instead of mearly attempting to renew leases. The assumption is that these DHCP assigned addresses are non-routable, LAN addresses. Whatever address the router uses on its WAN side would not be affected by the suggestion.

 

If your configuration is different then the common NAT arrangement, you might want to make that clear to the readers here.

 

Dave

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I would love to have a static IP for several reasons but as far as I can tell our IP addresses are set by our cable ISP who insists that they are unable to provide static IP unless I downgrade to an ADSL connection.

 


Sorry I wasn't clear. Your network topology wasn't clear in your original post, but from the above quote it sounds like you may be plugging all of your computers directly into your cable "modem" [router], and it provides DHCP IPs to your client computers from a pool of dynamic IPs allocated by the ISP. For a couple of reasons you may want to get a simple router or firewall appliance to put between your cable "modem" and your LAN, to hand out unroutable DHCP IPs assigned by static mapping from the MAC address. Lots of routers/firewalls can do this if you don't want to run a DHCP server on one of your LAN computers. Having NAT with static DHCP maps would give you protection from bad guys on the internet, and would also keep each of your LAN computers at the same IP. That's a little beyond the scope of Retrospect help, though.

 

Sorry, I assumed that you were running a standard LAN with non-routable (192.168.x.x or 10.x.x.x) IPs assigned by a DHCP server. My error. If you are getting dynamic IPs from a DHCP pool at your ISP, they could change every time the DHCP lease runs out or every time each computer reboots. You can't count on them staying the same.

 

Russ

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