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I need help with the restore process and a corrupted but still operating OS X 10.4.10 system. I have two snap shots that are useable. The older one contains a viable operating system, the new more recent backed up files but no operating system , They are both on a external hard drive. If I use Retrospect's bootable CD how could I install the backed up operating system and files?

 

Thanks

A. Stone

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First you "Restore an entire disk" and restore the older one with an operating system.

 

The you "Restore files from a backup" and restore the more recent files. These will be placed in a folder, so you need to move them manually after the restore is finished.

 

(It would have been better to always backup all files, including the OS)

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Thanks for your response. In the "Restore files from a backup" are the files that have changed in the interim between the backups the only ones placed in the folder.

 

Thanks

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No, normally all files are placed in the folder.

 

But you can select which files you want to restore.

In the "Browser menu", you can select the files that are changed after a certain date/time.

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At what point in the second snapshot do I uses the browser menu?

 


When you are selecting the files you want to restore from the backup.

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Got a message when trying to implement full disk restore:

"Sorry Retrospect Prep failed error -24161 Catalog version is too new.

 


This problem is probably because you are using the Retrospect CD to do the restore, and you probably used a more recent (updated) copy of Retrospect to make the backup than the one that is on the Retrospect CD.

 

In that case, I would suggest installing Retrospect from the CD, then downloading and installing the most recent Retrospect updates from the EMC web site, then using that installed Retrospect to do the restore. The Retrospect updates are here:

Retrospect Macintosh updates

 

I'm a bit concerned about your comment that you have a "corrupted but still operating OS X 10.4.10 system". Before doing anything with this disk (such as installing Retrospect or restoring anything to it), I strongly suggest that you boot from your Mac OS installer CD/DVD and run Disk Utility to repair that disk. You will end up with a big mess if you install anything on a corrupted filesystem.

 

Russ

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Russ,

 

Thanks for your response. I did use the installer and Disk Utility but to no avail, it couldn't repair the disk. Should I try to reinstall Retrospect as you suggested?

Thanks,

Allen

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I did use ... Disk Utility but to no avail, it couldn't repair the disk.

 


Exactly what do you mean here? That you couldn't get Disk Utility on your install DVD/CD - not on the startup disk to "Repair" (not repair permissions) the disk? if so, you are hosed and need to initialize and reinstall the OS on that disk, update to current version level in Software Update, reinstall Retrospect, update to current level, restore from that. There is no use doing anything with that disk if it has a trashed filesystem that Disk Utility cannot fix. A good filesystem is a prerequisite to being able to do any install/restore onto that disk. You need to be booted from the Mac OS X Install DVD/CD to be able to repair the startup disk (because Disk Utility needs to unmount the disk to do the repair - can't do that to the startup disk).

 

Copy off anything that matters from that disk before doing the initialize (especially any Retrospect catalogs - unclear where you have them) because the initialize will blow everything away. Also note that you may have some things on that hosed disk that are more recent than your last good Retrospect backup, so you might want to save them away.

 

By the way, you would still be in this same situation even if you had made a bootable Retrospect Emergency CD/DVD because you need a good filesystem on a disk before you can do anything to that disk (except initialize it).

 

Russ

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Russ,

 

I had been warned by other users about problems with Retrospect and I now understand their concerns. I'm switching to "duplicate."

 

Thanks.

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Ok, but I wasn't intending to warn anyone about "problems with Retrospect". It's not a perfect product, but it does mostly work. I was just trying to help you get going and explain the reasoning behind my suggestions.

 

In this instance, you haven't indicated anything that is a "problem with Retrospect", only a bad filesystem. Retrospect can't cause that, and it can't fix that. All bets are off for any program running on a trashed filesystem.

 

Personally, I think that Retrospect's strength is not in its "duplicate" function, which seems like a poor add-on appendage, but is in its backup/restore function. There are many better choices for doing "duplicates" (copies) of files. SuperDuper! is one (but it can't do backups, only cloning/copies).

 

Russ

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Personally, I think that Retrospect's strength is not in its "duplicate" function, which seems like a poor add-on appendage, but is in its backup/restore function. There are many better choices for doing "duplicates" (copies) of files. SuperDuper! is one (but it can't do backups, only cloning/copies).

 


 

Well, since nothing much has been "added" to Retrospect in about 7 or 8 years, the Duplicate function should be judged for what it was back then. I can't think of any other program that performed this function under Mac OS 7, 8 or 9.

 

Today, with the nifty unix tools for file copying, and the brilliant Cocoa programmers such as Mike Bombich, there are indeed some better applications and methods for duplicating files from one volume to another.

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Today, with the nifty unix tools for file copying, and the brilliant Cocoa programmers such as Mike Bombich, there are indeed some better applications and methods for duplicating files from one volume to another.

 


rsync is broken, doesn't preserve metadata. It was fixed about 10.4.6 or .7, but broke again about .9 or so. CCC (the current released version) is broken, doesn't preserve metadata (but the upcoming release, now in beta, does seem to do so). That's the only reason I suggest SuperDuper! (which does preserve metadata, and which has a very simple interface). Last time I tested, at the release of 6.1, Retrospect did not preserve all metadata either (although the release notes say it does). There were no ACLs in Mac OS 7, 8, or 9, which is the root of the historical problem with Retrospect.

 

Russ

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I too have received the -24161 error.

 

I have just had my powerbook HD die on me and installed a new one. Booted from my Retrospect cd selected back up set and then got above error.

 

Is it possible to make a new retrospect cd (using another computer) to use? I can't use the Tiger cd as the back up was made after various upgrades.

 

Any advice gratefully received, just going back to throwing up.....................

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Unfortunately, the backup restore function seems to be problematic, so for the eighty and change I spent for the program, I'll stay with the duplicate for now. Waiting for new Apple system software. What I can't believe is that this company made no adjustments for server versions and restorations

Thanks

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Is it possible to make a new retrospect cd (using another computer) to use? I can't use the Tiger cd as the back up was made after various upgrades.

 


Yes, it's rather trivial. Use Disk Utility to make an image of the CD. Install current Retrospect and RDU onto that image. Burn a new CD.

 

The different issue, which is a bit more difficult but still possible, is if the OS on your Retrospect CD is too old to boot newer Mac hardware. There's a workaround for that, too, which involves imaging the Mac OS install CD/DVD that came with your comptuter, installing Retrospect and RDU onto that image, burn a new CD/DVD. You also have to do a hack to get Retrospect to run from the Utilities menu of the installer: Use the Property List Editor to add an appropriate entry to:

/Applications/Utilities/Installer.app/Contents/Resources/InstallerMenuAdditions.plist

It's pretty simple to figure out what is needed using existing entries as a template.

 

I don't believe that EMC has made available a newer version of Retrospect CD that works on newer computers. The issue is the version of Apple's boot CD that EMC has licensed - a newer version is needed to be licensed by EMC, I believe.

 

Russ

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Unfortunately, the backup restore function seems to be problematic, so for the eighty and change I spent for the program, I'll stay with the duplicate for now. Waiting for new Apple system software. What I can't believe is that this company made no adjustments for server versions and restorations

 

I can't believe Retrospect has made no provision for this problem!

 


 

It's unclear what you believe "this problem" to be. If it's the fact that there is no boot CD for currently shipping models, then yes, the company has lagged behind. The cost of the Apple license is probably trivial, while the cost of software and QA engineers is probably pretty high.

 

You don't describe the Type of Backup Set you are using. Unless you are using Removable Backup Sets, there really is no requirement to use the boot CD at all. Removable Backup Sets will fail when attempting to perform a Live Restore, while other Types of Backup Sets will work.

 

Since your data file backups are more current, you might consider just installing system software on your internal hard drive, then using Retrospect to Restore all your data files to a single folder. From there you can move those files where you want them to be. You'd loose your system configurations, but you'd gain a clean bed to reconfigure from.

 

If you want to do as Lennart suggested in post #98871 above, you'd be better off booting from an external FireWire hard drive and using that to Restore your full disk backup to an empty volume, then do another Restore from the newer Backup Set

 

In general, the program works as expected. The OS is complex, and there are lots of ways to do the different things a user might want to do. Matching files for Restore is complex and less then trivial. For me, I'd rather just Restore every single file without attempting to match; matching works great for Backups (where it gets only new and modified files).

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Yes, it's rather trivial. Use Disk Utility to make an image of the CD. Install current Retrospect and RDU onto that image. Burn a new CD.

 

Russ

 


 

Ok firstly thanks to all for help.

 

I am now showing myself to be the idiot I am - what does RDU mean???

 

I have resolved the problem in my own way as follows:

 

My back up was a normal back up on a partition of a firewire external HD, the cat file was also on this drive.

 

On another partition of the same drive I installed Tiger from my original discs and rebooted from that.

 

I downloaded the current version of retrospect on my son's imac (saved time setting up airport etc) and burnt on cd then installed on the partition with basic Tiger installed. Launched retrospect and restored complete disc on PB.

 

Job done. Now all I have to do is troll through and update everything as necessary, stupidly my last back up was from April blush.gif Lesson learnt wink.gif

 

Thanks again

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what does RDU mean???

 


Retrospect Driver Update

It's a file that goes into the Retrospect folder in /Applications, and provides device support (and is also a way that some bug fixes are distributed as well). The current RDU is available on the Retrospect updates page.

 

Good troubleshooting as to an alternate way to solve the problem. There are many ways to get to the goal of "by some means, run a current version of Retrospect", and you found one of them.

 

Sorry for being so cryptic. Ignorance does not correlate with intelligence. An intelligent person can learn. It's never right to criticize someone for being ignorant.

 

Russ

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Quote:

Quote:

Is it possible to make a new retrospect cd (using another computer) to use?

 


Yes, it's rather trivial. Use Disk Utility to make an image of the CD. Install current Retrospect and RDU onto that image. Burn a new CD.

 


 

Say what?

 

I came here on a search for the phrase "catalog version is too new," looking for advice similar to this.

 

I am trying to reinitialize a drive on a USB-only G3 iMac from an image on an external USB disk. I can't boot from the internal drive because I'm going to be restoring to it. I can't boot from a USB drive because the hardware doesn't support that. I cannot start the machine up into target disk mode, because this model doesn't have a target disk mode. The only thing I can do is boot from the Retrospect CD -- but it is 6.0, the backup image was made with 6.1, and so it won't do the restore.

 

I tried to follow the advice above, but I am buffaloed. There are no Retrospect or RDU on this CD for me to replace. There is an application called "Install Retrospect" (actually two, another for 5.1). I thought of opening the package in hopes of being able to replace a hidden copy of Retrospect, but this application isn't even a package.

 

What really buffaloes me is that I cannot even find an operating system on this CD -- yet my iMac will boot into OS X from it!

 

Can you provide more specific instructions?

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I can't boot from the internal drive because I'm going to be restoring to it.

 


Yes, you can.

 

Install the same OS version on the internal hard drive as the version you are going to restore.

Install Retrospect 6.1.x and the RDU.

Boot from the internal hard drive.

Launch Retrospect.

Restore with the internal hard drive as the destination.

 

I have done this a number of times.

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Quote:

I can't boot from the internal drive because I'm going to be restoring to it.

 


Yes, you can.

 

Install the same OS version on the internal hard drive as the version you are going to restore.

 


 

Thanks -- but as installing the virgin OS was the entire point of the restore in the first place, it looks like Retrospect is entirely useless to me.

 

What a joke -- I did this backup precisely so I could revirginize old machines quickly as they came in the door, and now I find that because my Retrospect boot CD wont read backups made with an update, and nobody can tell me how to update the CD, the exercise was entirely worthless.

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