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HELP! Can't reboot after restoring 10.2.6


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After a bad experience with Apple's 10.2.8 updater I decided to restore my 10.2.6 backup using RX 5.0.238. The 10.2.6 boot volume normally resides on the first partition of an 80GB internal hard drive, on a Beige G3 MT/300. This HD also contains my 9.2.2 Classic volume and a large "scratch" volume (typically used for digital video and CD burn images).

 

I rebooted to a 9.2.2 Zip disk, erased the OS X volume, and--from that Zip disk--executed a complete volume restore from the backup (on CD-RW). So far, so good.

 

I rebooted to the OS X 10.2 install CD from which I ran Disk Utility to check for problems and repair permissions. Just the usual suspects there, nothing unusual, everything was repaired. I then rebooted to my Classic HD volume, opened Startup Disk, selected the 10.2.6 volume, and rebooted.

 

No blue screen.

No gray screen, either.

What I got was the Open Firmware prompt, instructing me to type BYE to boot MacOS, BOOT to continue booting, or TTYA IO for "serial device boot" (which I took to mean "boot from a server"). BYE returned me to Classic. BOOT returned a "CLAIM failed" error message, and another prompt. TTYA IO shut down the machine.

 

The last time I saw THAT screen was while I was experimenting with Linux (long since hosed).

 

I've received varying answers as to the cause of this problem, as I've encountered it before when I installed the new HD--so-called "bootable backup utilities" (e.g., CCC, Xupport, etc.)running under this same 10.2.6 didn't work, and I finally resorted to an "archive and reinstall" on the OS X volume, which is a royal pain.

 

A bad backup is worse than no backup, because:

(a) It's a huge waste of time (in my case, most of the day for a full backup)

(B) It creates a false sense of security

© What do you do when you've erased your hard drive for a restore which won't work?

 

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Quote:

I rebooted to a 9.2.2 Zip disk, erased the OS X volume, and--from that Zip disk--executed a complete volume restore from the backup (on CD-RW). So far, so good.

 


 

No. So far, no good.

 

Mac OS 9 does not see or understand the complete information contained in Mac OS X files.

 

Retrospect was happy to write the backed up files to disk for you under OS 9, but it did so without including the necessary unix information of each file. This is fine for data files (especially if you're going to use them under OS 9). But the critical system files and their links were not Restored in a working state.

 

**It is not possible to restore a bootable OS X system when the computer is running OS 9**

 

You have two options (each covered in the Read Me or the manual, I'd assume):

 

1: Boot from some other OS X volume and Restore (external FW or SCSI drive, Retrospect 5.1 Restore CD, etc)

 

2: Install OS X from disks (to the same system level as what resides on the Snapshot), then install Retrospect, then Restore, then reboot.

 

 

Restoring unix files to a non-unix OS is bad because:

(a) It's a huge waste of time (since it won't boot when you're done)

(B) You just have to do it all over again following the instructions in the manual

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Quote:

**It is not possible to restore a bootable OS X system when the computer is running OS 9**

 

You have two options (each covered in the Read Me or the manual, I'd assume):

 

1: Boot from some other OS X volume and Restore (external FW or SCSI drive, Retrospect 5.1 Restore CD, etc)

 

 


 

doh.gif

Got it...

Luckily I have a spare HD (the OEM HD, as it turns out) which I installed OS X on this morning. I'll swap it for the Zip and run the restore from there. I also have the catalog, so I can at least save that step, right?

 

BTW, since I purchased RX online, I don't have an official Restore CD. How can I build one? I do now have BootCD (along with Toast of course); I thought it might be useful...like this Windows PC, rescued from a dumpster two months ago, which I'm writing this on...

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Unfortunately I may be the victim of something which isn't Retrospect's fault, or mine either. It may be a hardware limitation in the Beige G3 series concerning large hard drives (not large volumes , large physical drives).

 

After booting from this second OS X drive, I restored again--this time making sure "Ignore permissions" was UNchecked, and setting ownership of the drive to myself. Again, I repaired permissions with Disk Utility (and it found a bunch of them, and fixed them all). No dice. Same Open Firmware screen, same "CLAIM failed" error.

 

As implied, or stated, before, I've had problems of this sort with "bootable backup" utilities--that is, those using the Unix "sudo ditto" command to copy files (as root) while retaining permissions. I attempted to use these when I installed the 80GB drive (and yes, the OS X partition was--and is--within the first 8GB of this), to no avail. Typically the Mac would stubbornly boot into either the Classic partition, or show the gray "prohibited" screen. I was finally compelled to do an archive-and-reinstall, as I'm contemplating doing now. I need my Mac back.

 

In other words, whatever hardware limitation that makes, say,

"sudo ditto /System/Library/* /Volumes/Backup/System/Library/" fail may be making Retrospect fail as well.

 

When restoring (using an OS X boot CD, say), do I need the root account enabled to restore the drive?

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