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full volume restore - Windows file version problems!


jcramer

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Hi,

My disk crashed and had to be replaced. I had been running Windows 2000 SP3

and Office SR-2, each with all of the various security and other updates available

on the Windows and Office Update web sites.

 

When I reinstalled Windows on the new disk, I loaded from the Windows 2k SP1

CD that came with the computer, and I did not re-load Office at all from the original

CD.

 

I then did the full volume Retrospect 6.0 Restore and it worked, but complained about

version mismatches on Windows system files.

 

I am worried about ending up with an unstable system or system problems down the

road. The system boots and it and my applications seem to be OK generally. However,

there are some funny things like:

- Windows Update site and HFNetchk patch version checker are both telling me that

I have not in installed certain Windows SRs and updates, even though I did install

them (the Windows Update site shows me a history of what I had installed. The patch

checker program tells me that some of the patches are not installed because some

of their file versions are wrong. Also, there are some funny things like Internet Explorer

coming up saying it is version 5 when I had installed 6, and some other version information

mismatches.

 

What is the correct procedure for me??? Should I reinstall Windows 2k SR1 again,

and reformat the disk, *then* run Windows Update to SR3 and the patch level that

the files on my backup are at? And what about Office.

 

Any tips or relevant info would be greatly appreciated!.

 

Jim

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Hi

 

Sounds like the restore just didnt quite take

 

You can always run the restore again and it will replace only new and changed files. You can also try restoring from another snapshot.

 

 

 

If you want to go the long way around you can reinstall WIndows 2000 into a folder other than the "winnt" folder. Then run the restore again. That will save Retrospect the trouble of having to overwrite your active system files. If you try this you might want to update to the same service pack you had when you did the backup. It should not matter but it may help.

 

Nate

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Hi Nate,

 

Thanks for the suggestions.

 

I found that it does make a big difference whether or not you update

to the same Service Pack that was installed when the backup you are

trying to restore was done if you are going to Restore to the active system

folder. I found a note somewhere that Retrospect will not restore files

on top of active system files. So, when I did the restore the first attempt with

an earlier SP installed, I was left with active system files from SP1 and many

restored system files, not active, from SP3. I reformatted the disk, reinstalled

my SP1 distribution disk, upgraded to SP3, then did the Restore and had no

problems.

 

I like you suggestion about, after formatting, insalling the original Windows version

(SP1 in my case) to a folder other than c:\WINNT, and then doing the Restore to

C:Winnt, avoiding the active system file dilemma. I will try that next time cause

it will save time of updating to the Service Pack and Hotfixes that were in the

system being restored.

 

Jim

I found a

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Why don't you use a Disaster Recovery CD? If you do, you don't have to install Windows at all. Just boot from the Disaster Recovery CD, then restore.

 

Also, just to confirm. If you do start with a Windows install, you MUST be at the same service pack level before doing the system restore.

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  • 4 weeks later...

The fact that Restrospect doesn't restore active files is a big issue for me. That means that if you create a backup of the system, install a service pack or some other os update, and then run into a problem and want to use Retrospect to go back to the state when it was still working, you won't be able to - unless, as you stated, you boot to a folder other than the active folder. But who wants to install a second copy of 2000 in a temporary folder to do that?

 

All backup programs have the active files problem. None of them do a very good job of restoring in my opinion.

 

Dantz - can't this be fixed?

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Jim Y. said:
All backup programs have the active files problem. None of them do a very good job of restoring in my opinion.

 

Dantz - can't this be fixed?

 


Frankly, personally I think that the best way to handle this is to use a hard disk imaging program. Much faster and neater. I still use Retrospect but it is mainly for file backups as opposed to system backups.

 

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Hi

 

Retrospect is designed to replace active files but there a lot of outside factors that can cause restores to fail. That is one reason the Retrospect disaster recovery CD installs the temporary OS into a non-default location.

 

What I mean to say is we know Retrospect can do a full restore of your active system. If you have a good backup with no errors that will not restore double check your media and then get in touch with Dantz TS as we will want to take a closer look.

 

Thanks

Nate

 

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>Frankly, personally I think that the best way to handle this is to use a hard disk imaging >program. Much faster and neater. I still use Retrospect but it is mainly for file backups as >opposed to system backups.

 

I agree. The imaging tools are THE BEST except for two things:

 

- In the past you had to boot to DOS to do the image. Drive Image fixes that now.

 

- Retrospect's Incremental Plus technology is so network friendly.

 

- Retrospect's individual file restore is better.

 

What I really want is something that works as easy for backups as Retrospect, and is as easy and complete for restores as Drive Image, but has Retrospect's Incremental plus technology.

 

What I'm trying to use Retrospect for is to back up our manufacturing machines. They automatically back themselves up once per week to a network drive. (These are machines that produce parts. Their data does not change often and the main thing you're preserving is the system state. But when something does change, I want to automatically capture it - once per week.)

 

What I would really like to do is make an image of the manufacturing machine as it is shipped to the production floor, and then use Retrospect for the automatic weekly backups. Then the restore process would be:

1) Restore the machine to the "As shipped" state from a backup image - using drive image or Ghost.

2) Use Retrospect to restore the latest snapshot.

 

However, if a service pack changes or who knows what other critical file, Retrospect can't restore the system correctly unless you boot to a temporary folder to do the restore.

 

Retrospect's disaster recovery would be good except that it requires you to update the disaster recovery CD:

 

- If you do a recycle backup

- If you add new hardware

 

I'm also not sure how Retrospect's disaster recovery works for recorving a backup that's stored on a network drive.

 

So, since Retrospect's disaster recovery doesn't work well for me, you say just install a copy of the OS in a temporary folder. A couple bad things about that:

- It takes forever.

- You need to create and know how to use the winnt.sif file - a normal install won't install 2000 or XP to a temporary folder.

- The correct ethernet drivers may not be included in the 2000 and XP installation CD.

 

So, to restore a manufacturing machine our production people would need to call a professional to restore the system (me) at 2:00am in the morning.

 

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Forget DR. Use a second harddrive (120G for $80), with preinstalled bootable Windows (2K, XP [actv. issue], etc.), Retrospect and Ghost/Drive Image. Can be used as a dest. for ghost images (don't need to use the whole HD), Retrospect backups (note: also use other destinations for other backups). For a restore, flip BIOS boot order, re-Ghost then re-Retrospect.

 

http://forums.dantz.com/ubbthreads/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=professional&Number=25959&Forum=All_Forums&Words=Second%20harddrive&Match=Entire%20Phrase&Searchpage=0&Limit=25&Old=6months&Main=25798&Search=true#Post25959

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Quote:

Jim Cramer said:

Hi,

My disk crashed and had to be replaced. I had been running Windows 2000 SP3

and Office SR-2, each with all of the various security and other updates available

on the Windows and Office Update web sites.

 

When I reinstalled Windows on the new disk, I loaded from the Windows 2k SP1

CD that came with the computer, and I did not re-load Office at all from the original

CD.

 

I then did the full volume Retrospect 6.0 Restore and it worked, but complained about

version mismatches on Windows system files.

 

I am worried about ending up with an unstable system or system problems down the

road. The system boots and it and my applications seem to be OK generally. However,

there are some funny things like:

- Windows Update site and HFNetchk patch version checker are both telling me that

I have not in installed certain Windows SRs and updates, even though I did install

them (the Windows Update site shows me a history of what I had installed. The patch

checker program tells me that some of the patches are not installed because some

of their file versions are wrong. Also, there are some funny things like Internet Explorer

coming up saying it is version 5 when I had installed 6, and some other version information

mismatches.

 

What is the correct procedure for me??? Should I reinstall Windows 2k SR1 again,

and reformat the disk, *then* run Windows Update to SR3 and the patch level that

the files on my backup are at? And what about Office.

 

Any tips or relevant info would be greatly appreciated!.

 

Jim

 


 

How one recovers from such a situation depends on how you installed the OS and apps.

 

If ALL of the OS files were on thre drive that crashed, ten restoring that drive should result in no conflicts, so I muist assume that not all OS files were on that drive.

 

Likewise, some apps might have installed some files in the OS common directories, or on other drives.

 

However, if you have a Retrospect DR recovery CD, you should be able to restore back to where you want to be.

 

Otherwise, you would need to first re-install Windows back to its SP 3 state BEFORE restoring files.

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This thread has primarily been about the fact that Retrospect (and most other backup programs) cannot restore the system completely accurately when the current OS path is the same as the restored path.

 

If the original OS was installed in c:\winnt and the current OS is installed at c:\winnt, you won't be able to do a proper restore.

 

To fix your problem, you will need to install your temporary OS to something other than c:\winnt. Installing it to c:\tmpwinnt would work. Then do your restore and everything should be perfect. Another person suggested putting the temporary OS on a second hard drive. I haven't tried that but I know you would need to fiddle with things in the BIOS to make that work properly.

 

Windows 2000 and XP don't make it easy to install the os in anything but the default folder (C:\winnt). To do that, you will need to create a winnt.sif file. Send me an email if you want more instructions on that and a sample winnt.sif file: james.a.youngNOSPAM@delphi.com (remove the NOSPAM).

 

As I mentioned earlier, all backup programs seem to have that problem (the imaging programs are the exception). It's very annoying. They don't really publish it very well. You'll usually see it in a technote somewhere. They do a very good job at backing up files and restoring data files. But system files are tricky to restore.

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Quote:

Jim Y. said:

This thread has primarily been about the fact that Retrospect (and most other backup programs) cannot restore the system completely accurately when the current OS path is the same as the restored path.

 

If the original OS was installed in c:\winnt and the current OS is installed at c:\winnt, you won't be able to do a proper restore.

 

To fix your problem, you will need to install your temporary OS to something other than c:\winnt. Installing it to c:\tmpwinnt would work. Then do your restore and everything should be perfect. Another person suggested putting the temporary OS on a second hard drive. I haven't tried that but I know you would need to fiddle with things in the BIOS to make that work properly.

 

Windows 2000 and XP don't make it easy to install the os in anything but the default folder (C:\winnt). To do that, you will need to create a winnt.sif file. Send me an email if you want more instructions on that and a sample winnt.sif file:
(remove the NOSPAM).

 

As I mentioned earlier, all backup programs seem to have that problem (the imaging programs are the exception). It's very annoying. They don't really publish it very well. You'll usually see it in a technote somewhere. They do a very good job at backing up files and restoring data files. But system files are tricky to restore.

 


 

Option RambleMode On

 

Yes, one cannot restore an OS over a running OS.

 

A temporary OS has nothing to do with the BIOS, just set up a mylutiboot environment using boot.ini, etc.

 

All MSFT OS make it wasy to install an OS anywhere you want, just select new installation, not upgrade, when doing the install, and the necessary boot.ini, etc. will be created/modified. I've got 4 Windows OS on my main system.

 

And, if one has a need to go back and forth amongst the OSes, that can be faciltated by sharing things such as My Documents, Outlook Express mailstore and address book, Recent files, Cookies, Favorites, History and Temporary Internet Files. Safest if the same version of IE and OE are used with all OS. Cannot safely share Outlook PST files if Outlook versions are (too) different. In my case, I have a different Office installed wit heach OS, so I cannot share Outlook files safely. Actually, I use Eudora for email, largely becaise I can safely share Eudora mailboxes and settings amongst the OS.

 

Option RambleMode Off

 

Go.Shopping = not RambleMode.Status

 

 

 

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