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More Rule H377 - testing & long


Camelhump
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I gave up yesterday -

I am back at it again today -- as an aside I just love beating my head against a wall --

 

I am trying to test various variations of Macpath to see what item(s) are selected for backup.

 

Can someone explain (or try to) the various results?

Thanks

 

all Rules run against the following:

OS X 10.6.4 computer, with a single user directory selected as 'favorite' and the Rule run against the user directory.

 

First I am using:

Folder Macpath ends with Music

 

Expected results:

- OS X Folder "music" which holds iTunes directories

- folder called 'Test Music' which hold s a single jpeg.

 

Actual results :

nothing

 

-------------

2nd I am using:

Folder Macpath contains Music

 

Expected results (folder names):

- Music- iTunes

- Test Music - 1 jpeg

- Test Music 2 - 1 jpeg

- This is my music folder - 1 jpeg

 

Actual Results:

matches expected results

 

------------

3rd I am using:

Folder Macpath is Music

 

Expected results (folder names):

- Music - iTunes -- because the entry point is the user directory there *is* a folder 'Music'

 

Actual Results :

nothing

 

------------

4th I am using:

Folder Macpath is like Music

 

Expected results (folder names):

- No Idea what to expect

 

Actual Results:

- Music

- Test Music

- Music 2

- This is my music folder

 

------------

5th (and last) I am using:

Folder Macpath is not Music

 

Expected results (folder names):

- everything except the folder 'Music' (expected based on Rule meaning to me)

- everything (based on previous test above)

 

Actual Results:

everything in the user directory

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A couple of comments...

 

If you use MacPath, you have to add a "/" to indicate a directory.

 

So for your first "ends with Music", it would need to read

 

ends with /Music/

*and* an additional line that says

ends with /Test Music/

 

(using "contains Music" would get both, but might get other things you don't expect. Remember, using "MacPath" has to be very explicit.

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I am trying to test various variations of Macpath to see what item(s) are selected for backup.

All your actual results are what I would have expected.

 

 

First I am using:

Folder Macpath ends with Music

 

Expected results:

- OS X Folder "music" which holds iTunes directories

- folder called 'Test Music' which holds a single jpeg.

 

Actual results :

nothing

This rule is looking for a file whose name is or ends in "Music." As Steve Maser notes, to indicate a directory (i.e., a folder, which will contain your desired files and perhaps subfolders), your pathname needs to end with a "/".

 

 

3rd I am using:

Folder Macpath is Music

 

Expected results (folder names):

- Music - iTunes -- because the entry point is the user directory there *is* a folder 'Music'

 

Actual Results :

nothing

This is looking for a folder at root level with the name "Music," which presumably doesn't exist.

 

 

4th I am using:

Folder Macpath is like Music

 

Expected results (folder names):

- No Idea what to expect

 

Actual Results:

- Music

- Test Music

- Music 2

- This is my music folder

It would appear that whatever algorithm Retrospect is using to determine "like" is actually delivering sensible results.

 

 

5th (and last) I am using:

Folder Macpath is not Music

 

Expected results (folder names):

- everything except the folder 'Music' (expected based on Rule meaning to me)

- everything (based on previous test above)

 

Actual Results:

everything in the user directory

Again, the only thing that should be excluded is the contents of a root-level folder named "Music." Since that folder doesn't exist, nothing is excluded.

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First thanks for the details -

 

First I am using:

Folder Macpath ends with Music

 

Expected results:

- OS X Folder "music" which holds iTunes directories

- folder called 'Test Music' which holds a single jpeg.

 

Actual results :

nothing

This rule is looking for a file whose name is or ends in "Music." As Steve Maser notes, to indicate a directory (i.e., a folder, which will contain your desired files and perhaps subfolders), your pathname needs to end with a "/".

I tried this and it did indeed select the 2 folders which are/end with 'Music'.

 

 

3rd I am using:

Folder Macpath is Music

 

Expected results (folder names):

- Music - iTunes -- because the entry point is the user directory there *is* a folder 'Music'

 

Actual Results :

nothing

This is looking for a folder at root level with the name "Music," which presumably doesn't exist.

 

Since the source selected is a user's directory - the "root" directory should be (at least to my thinking) the selected source; in this case the User's directory. So.... applying the Rule - 'Music' should be at the "root" level.

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