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Macintosh OS 10.4.9 Backup Strategy


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Hello All,

Can anyone give me a rough guesstimate as to what files I should be backing up on the various computers I have around my office?

I realize this is somewhat of a "newbie" question but the more I search for the answer the less I find. As of right now I am backing up approx. 10 users.

-I'm using Retrospect 6.1.126 and backing up to two 250 GB hard drives. One script goes from 4PM to 4AM and the other 4AM to 4PM

-My scripts include backing up the folders: "Users", "System" and any Filemaker or Now Up To Date Server type databases.

-I have included selectors to NOT backup music, pictures, or movies.

 

Am I missing anything? Should I only be backing up the individual Users in the folder as opposed to the entire folder. I realize that this is a very general question but I've no seen it addressed in these forums. Unless of course I'm not looking in the right area.

 

Any guidance would be well appreciated.

Thank you.

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Quote:

-I'm using Retrospect 6.1.126 and backing up to two 250 GB hard drives. One script goes from 4PM to 4AM and the other 4AM to 4PM

 


This part of your strategy is puzzling. Are you saying that it takes your script 12 hours to complete? Why not just make a single backup run at night when everyone is gone? That would give you quiescent systems. And I'm surprised that 250 GB is enough for 10 users' computers.

 

Quote:

-My scripts include backing up the folders: "Users", "System" and any Filemaker or Now Up To Date Server type databases.

 


You are aware, aren't you, that FileMaker and Now Up to Date need to be not running in order for a consistent backup to be made of their databases, don't you? Otherwise, you might not be getting anything useful to restore.

 

Quote:

Am I missing anything? Should I only be backing up the individual Users in the folder as opposed to the entire folder.

 


Really, you aren't asking the right questions.

 

It all depends on how much time you want to spend when (not if) a machine's drive, etc., goes south and you have to do a bare metal restore, how valuable your data is, etc.

 

I would suggest, before you ask these questions, you first figure out what your backup policy should be. A good discussion is here:

Backup Policy issues

 

For us, I back up everything except for browser caches and temp files. Might take a while, for example, to get preferences right, etc. But our needs aren't yours.

 

Russ

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Thank you Russ for your insight. I will review the Backup Policy issues you suggested. I guess that was all I was asking for. A point of the finger in the general direction to keep me from getting into trouble. I sense in your reply that my questions were of a "newbie" nature. Yes that's right. As I stated in my general question: "I realize this is somewhat of a "newbie" question but the more I search for the answer the less I find." Sorry to burden you with my questions. Nonetheless, thank you for your reply. I will try to do more research before I post to this site in the future.

 

Peter

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Actually, I wasn't trying to imply that you are a "newbie". Many old people never did the backup policy assessment and get burned when they have a fire. We did have a fire a couple of years ago, and our offsite backup and our contingency plans saved our butt. Even though we are a small law firm, we had the procedure in place and were up and running in temporary offices on Monday morning after a fire Friday night that took out our floor of our building.

 

My best suggestion is that you assess your needs, and then do some testing to see what you are able to do for a ground zero restore. Not only to you have to understand your needs, you also have to test and be sure that the procedures you put in place work and are documented. A crisis is not the time to find out that some critical data hasn't been backed up.

 

It's very important to understand that what is important for one business installation may not be right for another. For example, if you are using Radmind to manage images for your client computers, with network home directories, then there is nothing on the client computers that matters. Or, if you have public access computers, then the data on them would not be important either. It all depends on your workflow and the cost to you of losing data.

 

Russ

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