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Connecting to Clients outside same subnet


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I'm having trouble connecting to Clients that reside outside the same building as our Retrospect Server. I have Subnet Broadcast turned on and configured. I'm able to connect to the client via IP/DNS name but once I restart the server I need to go back in and "Connect" to the client again (the client is greyed out until I manually open the client and hit configure). Our router/switch is not configured with Multicast and is not an option in our area. We already updated all of our clients to 6.1.130, still no help. Any suggestions?

 

Also another quick question: How can I tell the IP address of a client if the client has been renamed? Am I missing something?

 

Thanks!!

 

Info: X-Serve - 10.3.9 running Retrospect 6.1.126

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There are several issues here that you are confusing.

 

The first one is that, because of limitations in your configuration (multicast not an option), "normal" Retrospect options for discovering clients might not be available for you. Fine, there are ways around that.

 

The second is that you may not have forward and reverse DNS set up properly. If forward DNS is set up properly (which is different from being able to connect to the client by name using some of the various Apple discovery mechanisms), then you will be able to connect to the client by name using various internet protocols, and you will be able to look up the IP address using Network Utility (the GUI way) (or "dig" in Terminal, for the command line way).

 

Here's how to do it in dig:

Code:


dig yourclient.yourdomain.com

the result will be the IP address for that name. E.g., buried among the verbose output will be:

Code:


;; ANSWER SECTION:

yourclient.yourdomain.com. 86400 IN A aa.bb.cc.dd


(where aa.bb.cc.dd will be the IP address). If you have the IP address and want the name, then, IF your reverse DNS is set up properly, the command:

Code:


dig -x aa.bb.cc.dd ptr

(substitute the IP address for aa.bb.cc.dd) will return, among the verbose output:

Code:


dd.cc.bb.aa.in-addr.arpa. 86400	IN	PTR	yourclient.yourdomain.com.

Now the third issue: You are going to have to set up a mechanism so that each client gets the same IP all the time so that it doesn't get a random IP from a DHCP pool. The two ways to do this are:

 

(1) assign the client a static IP address. Make sure that the static IP is cleared with your network coordinator, is in the right subnet, and is not within a DHCP pool of dynamic addresses that might be assigned to some other DHCP client. If this is done wrong, multiple machines will end up with the same IP on your network, and grave disorder will result.

 

(2) (the "right" way, in my opinion): have your DHCP server always assign the same IP address to the client based on the client's MAC address, from a "static map" pool of DHCP leases. This allows centralized management of IP addresses that are coordinated with your DNS server's zone files.

 

Now the fourth issue, getting Retrospect to talk to the client: If the client always has the same IP, then just add the client to Retrospect by IP address. See the manual for how this is done. It's rather straightforward.

 

Hope this helps, ask if questions.

 

Russ

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Thank you for your response!! Well it looks like I may be out of luck with the Broadcast option in Retrospect if it does require multicast. Our DNS servers are set to reverse and forward and we use static IP addresses (why? too many reasons to answer why in this forum). So I guess I will continue to add the client manually via their IP address. And maybe I missed something, but is there a way to determine the client's IP address after renaming the client?

 

Thanks again for your help.

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Quote:

How can I tell the IP address of a client if the client has been renamed?

 


 

Please note; the "name" given to a Retrospect Client machine has nothing to do with DNS or with the machine's IP address. Renaming a client from withing Retrospect has no effect on its IP address.

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Maybe I'm not explaining myself very well (happens quite often :-) I'm just hoping there's a way to tell what IP address Retrospect is using to connect to a client.

 

I'm in the process of "cleaning up" 4 Retrospect servers that have a lot of incorrectly named clients. In order for me to properly administer them, I need to know what IP addresses the clients are connected to. So far I haven't been able to find a way to do this. I understand this isn't a normal way of administering clients, but it's something I've stepped into and I'd rather not have to forget and reconnect to over 250 clients.

Thanks for trying to help...

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Quote:

mswinkels wrote:

And maybe I missed something, but is there a way to determine the client's IP address after renaming the client?

 


 

Quote:

Dave wrote:

Please note; the "name" given to a Retrospect Client machine has nothing to do with DNS or with the machine's IP address. Renaming a client from withing Retrospect has no effect on its IP address.

 


 

Hmmm.. maybe I read mswinkels' post differently. Dave's note is correct, but it's not clear to me whether the client is being "renamed" within Retrospect. Perhaps clarification is needed as to what type of "renaming" is happening here and just how the clients are being added.

 

Quote:

I'm just hoping there's a way to tell what IP address Retrospect is using to connect to a client.

 


Well, that's an easy one. See page 99 of the Retrospect Users Guide:

Retrospect Users Guide

 

Just do a Get Info on the client.

 

But to get to the root issue here, by default, I think the Retrospect client uses the Bonjour name for the computer that shows up in the Finder for browsing your network. That can be different from the DNS (and HOSTNAME) name for the client for TCP/IP purposes. And Retrospect (the server program, not the client) lets you rename the clients (Configure > Clients), but this does not change the DNS name.

 

And you can add clients by their Bonjour name (the usual way, if Bonjour broadcast passes around on your network - you don't seem to have that) or by IP or by DNS name (the last two are added in the same place).

 

In the case of DNS name, since you have static IP and you say that your DNS works forward and reverse, renaming of the "DNS name" of the Retrospect client (meaning, what DNS name is associated with the IP) would happen in your DNS zone file.

 

So it's going to depend on how your client was added. Seems like you are doing some archeology here, trying to get things "nice" and matching. I would suggest that you do a "get info" on each of your clients, compare with your DNS zone files and inventory lists from a network mapping program.

 

You might find the freeware "WakeOnLan" utility helpful because it can do network discovery as well.

WakeOnLan

 

Hope this helps, good luck.

 

Russ

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Quote:

I think the Retrospect client uses the Bonjour name for the computer that shows up in the Finder for browsing your network.

 


 

I'm pretty sure not.

 

Rendezvous didn't make the scene 'till 2002 (OS X 10.2), while the client configuration process has been the same for longer then that.

 

When the client software (OS X daemon or Classic Mac OS cdev) is installed for the first time, it takes as its temporary name the File Sharing name as seen in the Sharing preference pane or the File Sharing control panel (often the system default of User_Name's Computer). This is not Rendezvous/Bonjour/ZeroConfig.

 

When the Retrospect application connects to this client for the first time, the user is offered the opportunity to change or confirm that name.

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