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How can I get a simple list of all the files in a backup?


philx509

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What I'm after is a "simple" list kind of like a DOS directory listing.

 

Kind of like ' dir /s ' which produces a recursive listing of all files and directories.

 

I've tried exporting from the backup catalogs, but that's way, way overkill for me. Is there any utility that can do this for me?

 

Thanks,

 

crazy.gif philx509 tongue.gif

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Hi

 

A flat list is hard to come by.

Can you explain why you need the list? Maybe we can come up with something similar enough.

 

Thanks

Nate

 


 

Sure. I would like to maintain a catalog of all my archived files in one of the popular "disk" archiving programs, or (shudder!) build my own using MS Access. So I want to create a list that says, in effect:

 

These are all the files, by name and directory, on a given tape.

And then I can easily locate any archived file by searching on its name and I'll get back the name of the archive tape.

 

If there is some script or utility that already exists to do this, please let me know. I'm not much of a programmer. tongue.giffrown.gif

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Hi

 

Retrospect knows where each file is stored but it can't tell you which tape contains which file. Hate to say it but you're out of luck on this one.

 

Thing is, the catalog file is essentially a database of all the backed up data. During a restore you will be prompted only for the tapes required for restore so you don't have to manage a list of tape/file mappings.

 

Judging from your question I assume you want to take some tapes off site and then only bring back the tapes required for restore? You can always run a mock restore ahead of time and see which tapes Retrospect asks for.

 

Thanks

Nate

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Hi

 

Retrospect knows where each file is stored but it can't tell you which tape contains which file. Hate to say it but you're out of luck on this one.

 

Thing is, the catalog file is essentially a database of all the backed up data. During a restore you will be prompted only for the tapes required for restore so you don't have to manage a list of tape/file mappings.

 

Judging from your question I assume you want to take some tapes off site and then only bring back the tapes required for restore? You can always run a mock restore ahead of time and see which tapes Retrospect asks for.

 

Thanks

Nate

 


 

Ah. I mis-spoke. What I want to do is identify the --> backup set <-- that a particular file is located in. I backed up a lot of "stuff" (fonts, downloaded gifs of trains, downloads of desktop themes, hi-res scans of many, many, many 35 mm Kodachrome slides, etc., etc., etc.) into backup sets that were usually one tape each. Thus:

 

backup set name = tape name

 

I don't necessarily want to take tapes offsite. This is a home network, not a business network. But I do keep all the "archive" tapes in two boxes that are kind hard to reach where I store them, so it's would be nice to say:

 

Hm. Let me pull up all those pictures of the ABC railroad. Either my slides or downloaded gifs.

 

 

 

See what I'm trying to do.

 

Does this explanation make it easier to address my question?

 

cool.gif

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Hi

 

That makes sense but Retrospect still won't give you a good list

Your best bet is to do a search for files restore and see what media it asks for . At least you will know whick box to open up...

 

Thanks

Nate

 


 

Nate, I have alwasy been under the impression that you can do a file restore searech only within a given backup set. No? Can I do a file restore search across many different backup sets?

 

And, actually, that is kind of going at the problem in the wrong way. I want some easy way to export (I guess) the contents of a backup session into some sort of utility that will extract file names (and other info) for me. And do it automagically. smile.gif Does this make sense?

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Hm. Let me pull up all those pictures of the ABC railroad. Either my slides or downloaded gifs.

 


 

Pardon my intrusion, but this sounds like you are trying to use something for which Retrospect was not designed. You need (image) catalogueing software for something like that, not backup software.

If you are using Retrospect to archive files such that you can then remove them on purpose from your hard disk to free up space, then you're asking for trouble (since Retrospect uses its own proprietary format that even Windows cannot read). What you better do is: generate small thumbnails of the images you intend to archive, then simply write a CDR/DVDR of your full-size pictures and remove them from your harddrive. Then put the thumbnails in a subdirectory that is named after the CDR/DVDR/tape on which you burnt them. If you then need your ABC Railroad pictures, all you need to do is find the thumbnails on your harddisk (can be done e.g. by Google Picassa) and you'll automatically know what CDR/DVDRs/tape to look for.

I have like 30G of pictures and I would never use Retrospect to archive them (i.e. write them away and then on purpose remove them from harddisk). I just write standard data CDR/DVDRs for that.

Archive is not the same as Backup.

 

Also the fact that you use many different backup sets is rather cumbersome, exactly for the reason you are experiencing now. I used to do it like that myself: a backup set for each partition, until I recently discovered (maybe it was new since 6.5) that you can backup multiple source volumes into one single set. The advantage is that for each incremental setup, you don't need to constantly swap tapes/cdr/whatever.. Admittedly, there is a disadvantage too: single point of failure, if your backup set is somehow corrupt, you loose the set for all your volumes. But for that I use 3 backup sets in a rotating scheme. It's a lot easier now as every week, I only have one backup set to run which covers all my drives (C,D and E).

 

But of course: YMMV wink.gif.

 

R.

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Hi,

 

I don't know if this would be a solution -

 

Create a folder called Backups.

 

Within that folder create folders for each Backup Tape.

 

Let us say Backup Tape 1 contained three backup sets (Fonts, Trains, Desktop). Export the Retrospect report for each backup set into the folder (Backup Tape 1). Thus the Backup Tape 1 folder would contain three .txt files containing a list of the three backup sets.

 

Label the tape.

 

Do this for each tape.

 

When you wanted to know where a particular file is you would point your Search tool at the Backups folder.

 

Kevin

 

repter: good idea regarding the thumbnails ... thanks

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Quote:

Quote:

Hm. Let me pull up all those pictures of the ABC railroad. Either my slides or downloaded gifs.

 


 

Pardon my intrusion, but this sounds like you are trying to use something for which Retrospect was not designed. You need (image) catalogueing software for something like that, not backup software.

If you are using Retrospect to archive files such that you can then remove them on purpose from your hard disk to free up space, then you're asking for trouble (since Retrospect uses its own proprietary format that even Windows cannot read). What you better do is: generate small thumbnails of the images you intend to archive, then simply write a CDR/DVDR of your full-size pictures and remove them from your harddrive. Then put the thumbnails in a subdirectory that is named after the CDR/DVDR/tape on which you burnt them. If you then need your ABC Railroad pictures, all you need to do is find the thumbnails on your harddisk (can be done e.g. by Google Picassa) and you'll automatically know what CDR/DVDRs/tape to look for.

I have like 30G of pictures and I would never use Retrospect to archive them (i.e. write them away and then on purpose remove them from harddisk). I just write standard data CDR/DVDRs for that.

Archive is not the same as Backup.

 

Also the fact that you use many different backup sets is rather cumbersome, exactly for the reason you are experiencing now. I used to do it like that myself: a backup set for each partition, until I recently discovered (maybe it was new since 6.5) that you can backup multiple source volumes into one single set. The advantage is that for each incremental setup, you don't need to constantly swap tapes/cdr/whatever.. Admittedly, there is a disadvantage too: single point of failure, if your backup set is somehow corrupt, you loose the set for all your volumes. But for that I use 3 backup sets in a rotating scheme. It's a lot easier now as every week, I only have one backup set to run which covers all my drives (C,D and E).

 

But of course: YMMV
wink.gif
.

 

R.

 


 

No problem. You are _not_ intruding. In fact, you raise a very good point.

 

However, and there always is a _however_

 

I can certainly do something like what you suggest going forward. But I have several years of archived "stuff" done the way I have described it. And, yes, locating a particular image is a problem.

 

I suppose I could go out and buy say 2-3 of the new 400 GB drives, and then dump ALL my tapes to these drives, then engage in a massive sorting exercise to achieve the result above. But, aside from the cost doh.gif of these drives (including a larger system case and power supply), you're talking about a lot of time for each step. doh.gif

 

So, I was hoping that some one else already had this problem and had solved it.

 

I'm afraid that I'm to have to export the session contents of each backup session of each disk, import them into Access or perhaps Excel, and then do hand-editing. Good project for a very long plane ride. Say to Mars and back, with stopovers and change of plane at Alpha Centuri. smirk.gif

 

philx509

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Quote:

Hi,

 

I don't know if this would be a solution -

 

Create a folder called Backups.

 

Within that folder create folders for each Backup Tape.

 

Let us say Backup Tape 1 contained three backup sets (Fonts, Trains, Desktop). Export the Retrospect report for each backup set into the folder (Backup Tape 1). Thus the Backup Tape 1 folder would contain three .txt files containing a list of the three backup sets.

 

Label the tape.

 

Do this for each tape.

 

When you wanted to know where a particular file is you would point your Search tool at the Backups folder.

 

Kevin

 

repter: good idea regarding the thumbnails ... thanks

 


 

Kevin,

 

This is kind of what I will have to do, only there is more than one tape! In fact, lots of tapes. And rather than search for something that I _know_ exists, I might want to do the opposite:

 

What do I have archived? and ask that question across all tapes. Er. across all backup sets.

 

Seems that the "simplest" way to accomplish that would be a merged list of files, where every filename is "tagged" with the tape it's is on.

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