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IanWorthington

Can't use Open File Backup option for ... (C:), error -3045 (there is insufficient storage space to complete the operation)

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        Can't use Open File Backup option for x15 os (C:), error -3045 (there is insufficient storage space to complete the operation)
        [*] VssWSnapVolume: DoSnapshotSet failed, winerr -2147212513, error -3045
 

The advice in the FAQS for this error are for Windows 7.  They don't seem to relate to W10 and don't appear to have been updated anywhere.

Anyone know how to fix this? C has plenty of free space so I assume it's not that at fault.  Google doesn't suggest anything for that function call(?) and winerr.

 

ian

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IanWorthington,

Prompted by that same KB article, I Googled "Windows 10 'system reserved'" without the outer double-quotes, and with the single-quotes around "system reserved" changed to double-quotes.  That directed me, among other things, to this AOMEI page.  I'm a Macintosh user, so good luck.😄

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8 minutes ago, DavidHertzberg said:

IanWorthington,

I Googled "Windows 10 'system reserved'" without the outer double-quotes, and with the single-quotes around "system reserved" changed to double-quotes.  Among other things, that directed me to this AOMEI page.  I'm a Macintosh user, so good luck.😄

Hi David --

 

Thanks for that.  My system doesn't show a "System reserved" partition though.  I'm guessing that's a W7 thing, maybe?  I see something rather more complicated:

image.thumb.png.d2d44dd4869cdfd0147bc05656997e89.png

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IanWorthington,

It's a Windows 10 thing too.  Read the second and third paragraphs—the ones above and below the screenshot—in this article.  That will tell you how to see the partition.

If you really don't have one, you may have to re-install Windows 10.  Read the rest of the article.  Then repeat the Google search in my preceding post, use the result to find a suitable video, and watch that.

P.S.: Here's a free download of some software that may enable you to create a System Reserved Partition without reinstalling Windows; Your Mileage May Vary, as we say in the States (your "handle" sounds British; you might consider adding to your Profile a Location containing at least your country).  Also, here's an old version of the Wikipedia article I found for System Reserved Partition; I've linked to the old version because its "Usage" section—later deleted because it is un-referenced and may contain speculation or Original Research (WP no-nos)—may be informative.

Edited by DavidHertzberg
P.S.: Link to free download that _may_ enable you to create a System Reserver Partion, and a link to a useful old version of a Wikipedia article.

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1 hour ago, IanWorthington said:

Anyone know how to fix this? C has plenty of free space so I assume it's not that at fault.

As I understand it (and, like David, I'm a Mac guy), shadow copies aren't necessarily stored on the volume they are copies of. I thought the default was C:, but maybe that's old info.

Veeam has a decent article on troubleshooting this, and you should be able to get more information by looking for VSS errors in the application event log. I also notice you are using BitLocker -- I believe that means you must store shadow copies on their originating volume.

My Win 10 test machine does have a "System Reserved" volume -- and way fewer volumes than yours! Could you drag the divider down to show all volumes and repost the screenshot?

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Slightly more clarity on this, I think:

According to this:

Quote

The System Reserved partition is created when you are using a disk that is using legacy BIOS and the MBR (Master Boot Record) partitioning scheme. 

If you are using a computer with UEFI BIOS and GPT (GUID Partition Table) partitioning scheme, then it will create an EFI System Partition.

So the "EFI System partition" sounds like it's replaced the System Reserved Partition on modern systems.   That's fortunate, as this is the way it came delivered from Dell: the only thing I've done is partition the user area (C: and E: in the image.)

Could you drag the divider down to show all volumes and repost the screenshot?
There are a bunch of other drives but excepting C and E:, I think the image shows everything of interest, no?

> Veeam has a decent article on troubleshooting this, and you should be able to get more information by looking for VSS errors in the application event log. I also notice you are using BitLocker -- I believe that means you must store shadow copies on their originating volume.

That's interesting, many thanks.  When I do a LIST, I see:

C:\Windows\system32>vssadmin list shadowstorage
vssadmin 1.1 - Volume Shadow Copy Service administrative command-line tool
(C) Copyright 2001-2013 Microsoft Corp.

Shadow Copy Storage association
   For volume: (D:)\\?\Volume{e7f0a8f8-fc28-11e8-830a-005056c00008}\
   Shadow Copy Storage volume: (D:)\\?\Volume{e7f0a8f8-fc28-11e8-830a-005056c00008}\
   Used Shadow Copy Storage space: 0 bytes (0%)
   Allocated Shadow Copy Storage space: 0 bytes (0%)
   Maximum Shadow Copy Storage space: 838 GB (6%)

Shadow Copy Storage association
   For volume: (B:)\\?\Volume{0013e761-0000-0000-0000-500600000000}\
   Shadow Copy Storage volume: (B:)\\?\Volume{0013e761-0000-0000-0000-500600000000}\
   Used Shadow Copy Storage space: 0 bytes (0%)
   Allocated Shadow Copy Storage space: 0 bytes (0%)
   Maximum Shadow Copy Storage space: 42.9 GB (9%)

So I tried:

vssadmin resize shadowstorage /for=c: /on=c: /maxsize=unbounded

and checked it:

C:\Windows\system32>vssadmin list shadowstorage
vssadmin 1.1 - Volume Shadow Copy Service administrative command-line tool
(C) Copyright 2001-2013 Microsoft Corp.

Shadow Copy Storage association
   For volume: (C:)\\?\Volume{9e7abab8-edf5-4943-bb7d-aba776385f7e}\
   Shadow Copy Storage volume: (C:)\\?\Volume{9e7abab8-edf5-4943-bb7d-aba776385f7e}\
   Used Shadow Copy Storage space: 0 bytes (0%)
   Allocated Shadow Copy Storage space: 0 bytes (0%)
   Maximum Shadow Copy Storage space: UNBOUNDED (100%)
...

But Retrospect is still not happy:

+    Normal backup using C at 01-11-2020 15:10 (Execution unit 1)
        01-11-2020 15:10:24: Finished scanning backup set data files
    To Backup Set xps15 C...
        [*] VssWSnapVolume: DoSnapshotSet failed, winerr -2147212513, error -3045
        Can't use Open File Backup option for x15 os (C:), error -3045 (there is insufficient storage space to complete the operation)


Application log shows:
 

Volume Shadow Copy Service error: Cannot find diff areas for creating shadow copies. Add at least one NTFS drive to the system with enough free space. The free space needed is at least 320 Mb for each volume to be shadow copied. 

Operation:
   Automatically choosing a diff-area volume
   Processing EndPrepareSnapshots

Context:
   Volume Name: \\?\Volume{9e7abab8-edf5-4943-bb7d-aba776385f7e}\
   Volume Name: \\?\Volume{0ef47772-8036-429b-adf4-6a5715e245dd}\
   Execution Context: System Provider

 

Space on the system partition is over 600MB:

C:\Windows\system32>dir s:
 Volume in drive S is ESP
 Volume Serial Number is 8A4C-1C1C

 Directory of S:\

21-Jul-20  10:43    <DIR>          EFI
               0 File(s)              0 bytes
               1 Dir(s)     611,786,752 bytes free

 

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IanWorthington,

The HelpDeskGeek article you link to and quote is dated 21 September 2012.  That's over 8 years ago, and is just under 3 years before the July 2015 first release of Windows 10.

I've noticed that, with all the screenshots you supplied in this thread, you have left one key question unanswered: what version of Retrospect Windows are you running?  Your last Forums post before you started this thread was in 2014, and to that post Scillonian's response—the last post in that thread—started with exactly the same question.

I'd suggest you contact Retrospect Technical Support, or Retrospect Sales if your version is earlier than Retrospect Windows 11.0—which added _full_ Windows 10 support (there was partial support in 10.5) in March 2016.

P.S. (since you haven't read this post yet):  Further down this TheWindowsClub article, which I linked to in this preceding post, is the "What is System Reserved Partition"  section.  That section starts out with

Quote

The System Reserved Partition holds the Boot Configuration Database, Boot Manager Code, Windows Recovery Environment and reserves space for the startup files which may be required by BitLocker, in case you use the BitLocker Drive Encryption feature [my link and emphasis]. 

Almost directly following that is a paragraph that starts out "If you wish to view the contents of this partition ....".  The article goes on to recommend using the diskpart command-line disk partitioning utility to delete the partition or to create a new one, but that's during Windows installation.   You may instead want to use the free utility I linked to in that same post, or this US$11 utility recommended by a poster on the Ars Technica Forums.

Here's a Forums post that deals with a -1102 error (page 421 in the Retrospect Windows 17 User's Guide) created by configuring BitLocker.  It concerns a Windows 8 "client", and may not apply to you.

 

Edited by DavidHertzberg
P.S.: Further _helpful_ hints, as opposed to expressions of scepticism.

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18 hours ago, IanWorthington said:

There are a bunch of other drives but excepting C and E:, I think the image shows everything of interest, no?

Not being a Windows user, I wouldn't no if there was useful information missing or not! I'll take your word that it isn't.

What I can't see from your screenshot is which is your "Active" partition. Googling that app log entry mainly gives (old) mentions that OEM tools will make the OEM partition "Active" whereas System Backup (based, IIRC, around VSS) needs the System Partition to be active, plus a few more that may or may not be malware related.

As well as David's questions, I'd ask: Has this ever worked? If it had but has stopped, what changed?

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