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kbisignani

Replicate Onsite Backup to the Cloud

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Hello all,

So I'm curious if someone can point me in the direction of "best practice" when it comes to backing up to a NAS and then replicating that backup off-site to the cloud (say something like Amazon Glacier or the like).

Is it as simple and straightforward as Step 1: Backup to NAS.  Step 2: Copy Backup Sets to Cloud

Or is there a more streamlined approach or something that helps to ensure I'm not using excess space in cloud?  I'd love not to have any of this operate during normal business hours and so I think incremental is the best approach here, but not sure what my exact configuration would be.

Any thoughts or pointers are appreciated.  Thank you!

(If helpful, I'll be using a Buffalo NAS)

~ Kyle

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kbisignani,

Here is the Mac-oriented post I wrote two years ago on the subject.  As you will see, I revised it per the head of Retrospect Tech Support and others, and it has not had any revisions by anyone else since.  I wrote it to deal with the needs of an administrator who wanted a safety net for his local backups, but evidently could not afford to store more than the most recent year's worth of backups on Amazon.  If you don't have that monetary restriction, or do not wish to backup the existing contents of your NAS, you can disregard the steps involving Grooming.  If you do not wish to copy to the cloud your existing NAS backups, you can disregard the steps involving making a copy and shipping it to your cloud provider; if you do wish make that copy, Amazon will now rent you an Amazon Snowball appliance that you must substitute for a shippable disk.

You don't say what under version of what OS you are running the "backup server", but I assume from the fact that you posted in this Forum that it is Windows.  You should therefore—in reading my post—substitute Transfer Snapshots for Copy Media Set, and Transfer Backup Sets for Copy Backup.  Alternatively you may want to read this very detailed Windows-oriented post, which has been updated for Amazon Infrequent Access, and the further-updating post below it.  This Knowledge Base article has a section on Amazon Glacier.

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Thank you David for the reply - and the links!  I did a cursory review of them last night but there's a lot of good information and follow up conversation that I want to really parse through.  SO thank you for all of that.

You are correct - this is a Windows server running the backups of other Windows (and one Mac) servers.

I'm going to start from scratch with a new NAS, I'll keep old NAS's offline for previous backups - they only have about 6-8 months on them anyway before they ran out of space and Retrospect started to complain.  The pure intention here is to replicate what I have being stored on the local NAS to a remote location.  The Buffalo's actually can do this natively, but I'm not sure if that's a good idea since I don't know what kind of "transactions" will be occuring and don't want to incur extra charges because of my ineptness.  I need to do more research on the topic and have a meeting on Tuesday with one of my vendors who I'll be going through to help me as well.

Again, thank you David.  I'll follow up with what we did, and how we did it, for the good of the order.

 

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kbisignani,

I remembered later that I had done another version of this post. That version was a partial rewrite for administrator WKTimes, who—unlike administrator jethro for whom the first post was written, I assumed didn't want to do "seeding" of an existing on-site backup to his/her new cloud backup.  I made that assumption because, as of September 2016, only Amazon S3—via its Snowball appliance—and Google Cloud—via high-speed Internet upload of disks/tapes sent to Iron Mountain—offered "seeding".

Amazon S3 and Google Cloud were, and I believe still are, expensive cloud service providers.  As of June 2018, there are a number of substantially cheaper cloud service providers certified for Retrospect. 15.  If you are in the U.S., they include Backblaze B2 and Wasabi and DreamHost.  Wasabi and DreamHost are S3-compatible, but don't provide "seeding".  Backblaze B2 is not S3-compatible, but offers rental of a B2 Fireball "seeding" appliance that sounds similar to an Amazon Snowball.

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