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bradp015

Retrospect 9.01 (401) wont allow skip BU member, keeps asking for same member

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Hi,

This system has worked for years.

Retro. keeps asking for member 343. I first loaded a blank dvd+r, it wrote to #342 dvd for back ups,  then asked for new member. I ejected disk, inserted new dvd (343), it then seemed to prep disk, start writing, then stopped writing and asked for new member. I clicked "choose media" button, and it was asking for the same member, 343. Thinking it may be a defective disk, I loaded another dvd. It did same: prep, write, stopped and ask for same number, 343.

I have tried checking off "missing" in the member list, but Retro. seems to be hung up on using 343.

Iv tried clicking "mark lost" and "skip"  in "choose media" button dialog. Still asks for same member, 343.

 

Can I find a way to skip 343 and start a new member? 344 and move on? Any other thots I could try??

 

I will check burner for operation with mac os.

Thank you for any advise you may have.

 

Screen shots of Retro.:

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/4zojgptpzy8czx0/Screenshot%202016-02-16%2020.42.35.png?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ubzmf9cvknkq6r0/Screenshot%202016-02-16%2020.51.52.png?dl=0

 

Mac pro 4,1 10.8.5,

 

Model Name:    Mac Pro
  Model Identifier:    MacPro4,1
  Processor Name:    Quad-Core Intel Xeon
  Processor Speed:    2.26 GHz
  Number of Processors:    2
  Total Number of Cores:    8
  L2 Cache (per Core):    256 KB
  L3 Cache (per Processor):    8 MB
  Memory:    16 GB

---

optical burner:

TSSTcorp CD/DVDW SH-S162L:

  Firmware Revision:    LC02
  Interconnect:    FireWire
  Burn Support:    Yes (Vendor Supported Drive)
  Profile Path:    VendorSupport.drprofile
  Cache:    0 KB
  Reads DVD:    Yes
  CD-Write:    -R, -RW
  DVD-Write:    -R, -RAM, -RW
  Write Strategies:    CD-TAO, CD-SAO, CD-Raw, DVD-DAO
  Media:    To show the available burn speeds, insert a disc and choose File > Refresh Information


 

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I did "use new member" on the initial dialog after clicking "backup" from the script list. That seemed to work. The member # it assigned is the same , 343. I did some backups and all seems well.

Id still like to hear any advise and outlooks you might have about this!

 

thank you

brad p

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Why are you still using DVD media? And with over 300 members? 

Think about all the disc swapping you need to do if/when you need to do a restore.

 

343 DVD discs are no more than about 1.5 TB. 

My advice is: Buy a 3 TB hard drive and start a new disk backup set.

 

 

This past weeks I have restore loads of archived files on optical media. I bought three 3 TB hard drives. One as "original" and two as "backups".

Now I have fast access to the archived files.

Here is a picture of the now redundant optical media:

post-8868-0-59997400-1455692138_thumb.png

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I understand your response to my old time methods. But for what I use it for it works really well. I back up audio projects for safety. Hardly ever restore, but when I need to, I can. I have 3 backup sets, DDS and 2 DVD dating back to 1997. I'v restored stuff from that far back. I still have a power mac clone running a very old version of Retro. Having to run all the members thru to bring that set forward is just too time consuming. The problem using Hard drive media is, it doesn't last... I need longevity.

If you know of media that's better than DVD (inexpensive too) that will last years and years, please let me know! Id' MUCH prefer to use hard drive media, it's so much faster. But they dont last. Iv considered switching, and adding fee's to my clients or making them buy hard drives (because my hard drive system wont last, so they need to deal with longevity) but I'm not crazy about giving my clients the responsibility of safe guarding there own data. (most are not tech savvy) I suppose I could use USB thumb drives for clients, but that will add considerable time and cost to daily work. Its not really practical having a library of thumb drives.

Any thots about my options and approaches are appreciated!!!

Thank you,

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Why are you still using DVD media? And with over 300 members? 

Think about all the disc swapping you need to do if/when you need to do a restore.

 

343 DVD discs are no more than about 1.5 TB. 

My advice is: Buy a 3 TB hard drive and start a new disk backup set.

 

 

This past weeks I have restore loads of archived files on optical media. I bought three 3 TB hard drives. One as "original" and two as "backups".

Now I have fast access to the archived files.

Here is a picture of the now redundant optical media:

attachicon.gifSkärmavbild 2016-02-17 kl. 07.53.17.png

Lennart, now your making me think a bit. Here's a raid drive from OWC. I would imagine this drive would work good with Ret. 9???

Q: is there anything that Im forgetting to think about if I move to this drive?

I would intend on using Raid 1 for redundancy, therfor Id have a 4T dirve for backup....

My other Q is ::: When this fills up, what options are practical to move old project backups to a permanent storage device?

Thank you all for your thots and opinions!

http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/External-Drive/OWC/Elite-Pro-Dual

Brad P

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The longevity of media is a concern for many museums and archives. There is no single or easy answer.

 

The problem is not so much the media as the reader devices.

You might have some old audio reel-to-reel tapes or audio cassettes at home. But do you have a working tape recorder or cassette player?

 

I did have a bunch of reel-to-reel tapes. I bought a HiFi DAT (Digital Audio Tape) player and copied all old tapes to DAT tapes. About the time I was finished, the DAT vanished from the market as a format. Sigh.

I copied the DAT tapes onto CDs. Now I really don't know what I'm going to do with the CDs. I must find a way to copy them to a new type of media within a decade, but which?

Maybe I rip them using Apple Lossless and put them onto my "normal" backups as well.

 

As for optical digital media, the writing is on the wall: Apple dispensed with optical drives years ago.

 

How long does a hard drive last? Probably about as long as a computer with a SATA (or PATA) interface. Then it is time to copy to the future media available then.

 

Now for your questions:

Retrospect can use any drive that can be mounted of the desktop. So your drive will be just fine, using mirroring. 

By the way, you should store backups off site, too. Think fire, theft, hurricanes, flooding, thunderstorms, you name it.

 

What to do when the drive(s) fill up?

You could start a new media set with new drives, or add the new drives as members to the same media set. I would do the former.

The old (full) drives can simply be stored.

 

You could, every five years or so, copy the old backups onto new drives.

 

You could also invest in an LTO tape drive and archive your files onto tapes. But that's an expensive option.

 

I started using hard drives for backups in 2010. They were 1 TB drives, having three on a rotating basis. They filled up in 2012. I stored the drives and bought a set of 3 TB drives. I started a new media set and made full backups. These lasted until January this your. So I bought a set of 4 TB drives. I just made full backups onto this set of disks.

 

This became a longer post than I intended. Hope you can make some sense of it. :)

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This is indeed a tough problem. You have to face up to the fact that you only have a small amount of data. 1.5T these days is just not that much.

 

A 3 TB drive costs what? $150?? For $300, you can set up a RAID mirror, and put all your data there, or put your data on one drive and use the other for the retro backup. Every 5 years or so, copy the data to a new drive.

 

Like it or not, that works well. Not only does it save a lot of swapping, it allows quick and easy organization of the data.

 

Another $100 every 5 years is a small price to pay for not having "longevity".

 

Just my opinion. YMMV.

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thank you for all the comments and help.

I actually have another older backup set of 300 or so DVD's (I started the 2nd optical when I went to version 9).

I also have about 70 DDS3 tapes dating back to 1997. Last summer I restored a clients project from 1997... I was amazed it worked.

I would have all the data on one back up set, but since new versions of Retro. dont play with older versions, I started new sets.

 

thanks

Brad

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