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philx509

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About philx509

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  1. The more that I think about my work habits, if I deleted a file, chances are it was a short-term or temp use, OR the file got renamed to better ID the file. Which means I would be happy with just the most recent set of files that still existed at the end of the backup period for that dataset. So, tell me if this is what I need to to so that I keep only the most recent version of all files in a backup set: 1. I select Configure. 2. I select Backup Sets 3. I select the backup set I want to groom. 4. I click on the Options tab 5. I click the "Groom to remove backups" box and I enter "1" for "older than." 6. I sit back while Retrospect runs the grooming process on that dataset. 7. I repeat this process for each dataset I want to groom. 8. I'm very happy, so I have a few beers. x509
  2. Scillonian, Good question! If I have a choice, I would like to also keep the most recent version of files that no longer exist on the volume, as long as I can distinguish between the two types of files. I would be OK with some process that resulted in two "children" files, one each for the files that still exist and no longer exist on the volume. I should have said in my initial post that I'm trying to recover a lot of space devoted to backup of files that aren't the latest version in that dataset.
  3. I have to start this question by saying that I am not an IT professional who has in-depth knowledge and training on Retrospect. I'm an "enthusiast" user with reasonable technical knowledge in general who uses Retrospect because it works very well to back up my home LAN, so I'm wiling to spend the money to buy Retrospect Professional. I need someone to point me in the right direction and then I will gladly read the manual to work out all the details. I use multiple datasets to back up various kinds of data, and I start a new dataset of each type either monthly, quarterly, or yearly. I have some datasets going back 5+ years now, and I would like to condense them so that I have just one copy of each file in each dataset, the newest version of that file. How do I go about doing that? Is this grooming, or it is something else? Whatever this process, can it be scripted? Can I select a dataset and then apply this script, without having to edit the script the way I normally do for backup processes? Again, once I am pointed in the right direction, then I will read the manual to work out the details. Thanks in advance. x509
  4. philx509

    simplify the backup data set full path?

    Understood. But I'm doing disk-to-disk where each backup set is relatively small, < 100 MB, on a 2 TB drive.
  5. My security software (Norton Internet Security) does daily updates on AV "signature" files, which of course get backed up. But old signature files have no real value, and I woudl like to be able to delete just those files from a backup set. Can grooming help me here? From what I can tell, NIS uses multiple files, in different locations, as part of this daily update process, and the file names are unique, so I can't just exclude these update files by name. If I'm wrong about any of this, I'm entirely open to any approach that solves my problem.
  6. I do only disk-to-disk backup. Whenever I create a new backup set, Retrospect creates a folder name with that backup set name, e.g. 2013-07 TransAct Data. But then it creates another directory (!) inside the first directory, e.g. 1-2013-07 TransAct Data. This subdirectory seems unnecessary. Is there any way to configure Retrospect to not create this subdirectory?
  7. I change my backup data sets either monthly or quarterly. I have seven different backup sets, and for each backup set, I need to manually remove the "old" backup set name, and insert the "new" backup set name. Are there any tools, even from third parties, that could automate this process? Ideally such a tool would also create the new backup sets also. Thanks.
  8. Quote: I have a large number of archived backup sets, generally 1-2 tapes each. I would like to import all the backed up files, their directory location, size, file date, etc., into an Access database. How can I script that procedure? So far, I have been exporting the contents of each archive session (from the .rbc files) into comma-delimited file, and then importing that file into Access, all manually. This approach does not scale well and I need something more automatic. I'm open to use of any scripting or other tools that are available on Windows XP. I have read the product manual and it does not seem to cover this situation (or maybe I missed the significance of what I was reading Retrospect 7.0, but willing to upgrade to 7.5 if necessary. Thanks Philx509 Can anyone help me here? Or am I asking for "the Impossible Dream?"
  9. I have a large number of archived backup sets, generally 1-2 tapes each. I would like to import all the backed up files, their directory location, size, file date, etc., into an Access database. How can I script that procedure? So far, I have been exporting the contents of each archive session (from the .rbc files) into comma-delimited file, and then importing that file into Access, all manually. This approach does not scale well and I need something more automatic. I'm open to use of any scripting or other tools that are available on Windows XP. I have read the product manual and it does not seem to cover this situation (or maybe I missed the significance of what I was reading Retrospect 7.0, but willing to upgrade to 7.5 if necessary. Thanks Philx509
  10. Quote: Hi Keep in mind that your photos are already in a fairly compressed state after scanning so you won't get anywhere near the compression rates that tape companies promise. Long story short, base your purchase on the native capacity of the tape. Throughput isn't such a big issue either. Chances are your PC will be able to keep up. Even if shoeshining does occur it will just slow the backup a bit. It shouldn't make much of an impact on storage capacity. Any of the tape formats you mentioned are fine. Thanks Nate Nate, Thanks. Good point about the photos already being compressed. I will be outputting TIFF files, because that is a lossless format. It's also way, way bigger than a typical JPEG. For the scanner I'm planning to get, at full resolution (4000 dpi) the typical output file is about 125 MB! Between the different formats, is any one inherently "better" or "less expensive" than the others? philx509
  11. Quote: I am a photo hobbyist and I am (finally !!) going digital. I plan to start by scanning about 4000 black and white negatives and 8,000 slides and color negatives. Using a high-res Nikon scanner, I figure that that I'm going to end up with about 250 GB, before I cull any bad images. Uh, I went back and redid the calculations. My existing photos will need about 1 TB. No way will I back that up on 4.7 GB DVDs. So, please help me out here even though this is not a business application.
  12. I'm a home user with Dantz Professional, but I thought that this forum would be the right place to ask about different high-capacity tape drive types. I'm trying to decide which tape drive technology best fits my needs. The ideal drive will store on one tape about 100-200 GB before compression. (but I would settle for 50-100 GB before compression to keep costs down). SCSI-based. Also a "reasonable" growth path with backwards compatibility for media. I've done some investigation into drive capacities and transfer rates. My biggest concern, aside from cost, is that the higher-capacity drives have transfer rates that my system/network can't sustain. Exabyte claims that their VXA drives are the only type that will change the tape speed to avoid "shoeshing." In practice, is this true? What about other drive types? Is there an effective lower limit to the speed change? E.g. if a drive can do 12 MB/sec, can it slow down to say 3 MB/sec? My other concerns arelong-term storage reliability and drive size. I would prefer an internal drive that can mount in a CD drive bay. Some of the LTO drives I've seen are "full-high" and won't work for me. To keep costs down, I will probably buy a drive that is at least one generation back from the current products. I might try to get a drive cheap on ebay. Are there good deals on new _media_ on ebay? What about buying media used? I've heard mixed about that. Once I know which drive types to consider, then I can do my research on specific models, cost of media, etc. Right now, I just don't know where to start or how to decide. Here are my needs. (interesting maybe but not necessary to answer my questions.) 1. My home LAN is currently about 25 GB for a total backup. I expect that to grow to at least 50 GB within two years. My current drive is a 7/14 GB Exabyte Eliant 820, and the media changes during a backup are inconvenient to say the least. 2. I am a photo hobbyist and I am (finally !!) going digital. I plan to start by scanning about 4000 black and white negatives and 8,000 slides and color negatives. Using a high-res Nikon scanner, I figure that that I'm going to end up with about 250 GB, before I cull any bad images. And once I get a digital camera, I figure I could generate several GB in a day's shooting. (With digital, "film" is free. That leads to lots more pictures than with a film camera.) And of course, as I start to edit/process these images, I will generate many more GBs. Instead of using DVDs to back up my photo collection piecemeal, I would prefer to use tape, so I could fit the entire collection on several pieces of media. And not have to deal with 'data base' issues because the DVDs have images that I've culled. thanks, X509
  13. philx509

    Old SCSI drives and XP

    Quote: I'm replying to my own post for the forum. The lack of replies implies that not many are using 4mm or 8mm drives. That is actually good..I could not recommend them. This despite having lots of 8mm and 4mm tapes. I picked up a Compaq DLT4000 cheap. I downloaded the StorageWorks software for it and upgraded its firmware. I used a DLT IV Performance was 77 MB/min to 230MB/min with an average of 115MB/min. Native speed for the drive is 1.5MB/sec . It would seem Retrospect is within the specs of the drive then. Anything is better the 20MB/min I got on the 4mm and 8mm. I'm off to make a DR CD now.. At is stands I recommend a DLT drive for anyone looking for a cheap backup device. How much for the DLT IV? Where? Ebay? How much for tapes? I'm using an Exabyte 8720 drive 7/14 GB, and about 60+MB/minute. Faster is better of course, and that is why I'm asking this question.
  14. Quote: Quote: If this is Retrospect 7, there is a new icon near the top of the screen that says Stop all execution activity. You should make sure that button is not pressed. http://kb.dantz.com/article.asp?article=7956&p=2 That was it? Man I have been trying to figure this one out myself for a few weeks and it has been frustrating. Finally checked this forum and the problem is solved in 2 min. thanks Duh, double-duh. some more duh. I too have been wrestling with this problem for about two weeks, since I upgraded to 7.0. I too checked out both clients, but the settings all seemed OK, and still the problem persisted. Then, as a last resort, I actually checked the Dantz site. Immediate solution! I know, for most "guys," checking the Dantz site is like stopping the car and asking for directions, like your wife keeps telling you to do. "Guys" just keep on driving.
  15. Quote: With Retrospect 6.5, you could use the Replace Corresponding files. This will replace any files you select to restore if the files do not exist or if they are different in anyway (different size, creation/modification date etc..) from the version that was backed up. Retrospect 7.0 has a new option to restore only missing files. Thanks!! This is exactly what I was looking for. I guess it makes more sense to upgrade to 7.0 and skip over 6.5 entirely. philx509
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