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DavidHertzberg

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Posts posted by DavidHertzberg


  1. A friendly soul has just done a major enhancement of the Wikipedia article on Retrospect, bringing it up from around 2006 to the present.  

     

    ....

     

    The friendly soul, who goes by the Wikipedia handle DovidBenAvraham, yesterday ran into problems with a senior WP editor who goes by the handle Diannaa.  She wrote "The reason I removed the content is because the quotations were excessive, comprising 30 percent of the article."  He wrote back "The reason I put so many quotations into the 'Retrospect Macintosh ...' sections of the enhanced WP article is that I would find it difficult to succinctly paraphrase descriptions of software features, particularly when those feature descriptions were originally written by expert technical writers."

     

    The quotations were mostly either from the "What's New" chapters of Retrospect Mac User's Guides since Retrospect Mac 9 (Retrospect Mac 10 is the version whose code seems to have become the basis—with a different UI—of Retrospect Windows 8), or from a 9 January 2009 e-mail from Mayoff announcing the beta of the infamous Retrospect Mac 8.  The User's Guides contain explicit copyright notices, but the e-mail—whose first part seems to be copied from an EMC press release—doesn't contain a copyright notice.  Nevertheless, Diannaa says,  "Under the terms of the Berne Convention, literary works are subject to copyright whether they are tagged as such or not. No registration is required, and no copyright notice is required." 

     

    DovidBenAvraham has e-mailed Retrospect PR, trying to get at least the e-mail "contributed" to the world under a Creative Commons license.  Meanwhile, in order to read the major enhancement of the WP article before Diannaa did all the removals, you'll have to look here starting at "Revision as of 09:25, 8 October 2016". Ain't the Wikipedia processes, the WP facilities, and the Hunt-Szymanski algorithm grand?


  2. A friendly soul has just done a major enhancement of the Wikipedia article on Retrospect, bringing it up from around 2006 to the present.  

     

    In doing so he made some statements in the section "Retrospect Macintosh 10 and Retrospect Windows 8" about the updating of Retrospect Windows 8 that may be open to question.  He doesn't know for sure, because he uses Retrospect Mac.  He would appreciate any replies with corrective information, and will try to incorporate these in the article.

     

    Of course, this being Wikipedia,  there is nothing stopping anyone from editing the article himself/herself.  Just remember to: A ) Sign up as a WP editor to prevent your IP from being made public. B ) Spend a few minutes learning to Edit Source; it's not that difficult.  C  ) You must provide references for factual statements; use the Templates dropdown in the editor and fill in the minimum necessary fields—you'll get automated warnings if you don't.  D ) Keep a Neutral Point of View in what you write; WP requires it.

     

    Thanks!


  3. Having yesterday evening added the contents of my post above as an Additional Note to my Retrospect Support Case, I received the following e-mail from Mayoff this morning:

     

    "Dear David,

    Retrospect Agent Reply can be found below.
     

     

    Agent Response:

    >The bottom line is that _Wake-on-LAN doesn't work at all_ for my MBP client, running the Retrospect 12.0 client under OS X 10.10.5 Yosemite, from my Mac Pro running Retrospect 12.5 under OS X 10.10.5. This may be a peculiarity of my Retrospect and OS X installations, but from other users' reports I don't think I'm the only one for whom this is the case.

    Thank you for the feedback. Our QA team has found results that are similar to your own experiences and we are continuing to investigate the issues so they can be addressed in a future release.

    Please let us know if you have any additional questions,
    The Retrospect Support Team

     

    ...."

     

    Need I say more?

     

    Or let me put it another way: Is there anyone for whom Retrospect Wake-on-LAN does work?


  4. I just (30 September) tested what I suggested in the post directly above this, on a Media Set that I will recycle tomorrow morning (1 October) with my "Sat. Backup" script.  The Rebuild ran on my 2010 Mac Pro "backup server" with Retrospect Mac 12.5 under OS X 10.10.5.  It ran at an average of about 6GB/min, rebuilding from a single member containing about 285GB on a USB3 disk.

     
    It worked, creating a Media Set of around 265GB at the rate of 5GB/min..
     
    However the consequences of my not cleaning up after that test were somewhat dire, and could have been worse had I not noticed them early this afternoon (1 October).  The Media Set I deleted was my "Media Set Blue", for which the final scheduled run of the incremental "Sun.-Fri. Backup" had been done two Fridays before.  It was due to be the destination of a "Sat. Backup" scheduled Recycle run this morning, so I thought there would be no consequences from using it in the test.  But I forgot to do the post-test cleanup of my schedules, as detailed in the new fourth paragraph of the post directly above this.  The result was that today there was a scheduled run of "Sat. Backup" to "Media Set Blue"—except that the run was a Normal backup of six drives instead of a Recycle backup (I'm not sure this makes any real difference), followed by a totally unintended second Recycle run early this afternoon of "Sat. Backup" to "Media Set Red"—which had previously been scheduled for a week from today.  I immediately canceled that because the drive for "Media Set Red" was not connected, but the "Media Set Red" catalog had already been Recycled.  I realized late this afternoon why that had happened, added back the schedules using "Media Set Blue" that had been automatically deleted from the "Sat. Backup" and "Sun.-Fri. Backup" scripts, re-adjusted the schedules that use "Media Set Red" and "Media Set White" back to the calendar weeks that they had previously next been scheduled, and did a Rebuild of "Media Set Red" from the single member on the drive—which I had retrieved from off-site storage because it will be used next Saturday.
     
    P.S.: Put first paragraph in past tense, since I finished the test.
     
    P.P.S: Added very important third paragraph about immediately putting the re-Added Media Set back into your Scripts.  

  5. ....

     

    So ... the results for Wake-on-LAN for my MBP seem to be: works fine when a Mac laptop client is put to sleep via a special keyboard combination on the laptop keyboardfails with a -519 error (which would be a -530 error after #6080 fix) when a Mac client automatically goes to sleep per System Preferences->Energy Saver optionsfails with a -519 error (which would be a -530 error after #6080 fix) when a Mac client is put to sleep via the Apple Menu

     

    To me that sounds as if presumably greater OS X involvement in the second and third cases is what causes Wake-on-LAN to fail on my MBP.  That may not apply to other peoples' Mac clients with their own installations of OS X.

     

    P.S.: Just noticed (on 18 September) a bug fix for Retrospect Mac 13.0.1 "Fixed issue where clients not found on network incorrectly reported as error -519 instead of -530 (#6080)"; put in parenthetical note after every mention of -519 in this post—no doubt you should mentally do the same for previous posts in this thread.

     

     

    The special keyboard combination in the first sentence of the first quoted paragraph is not really applicable.  It turns out Shift-Control-PowerButton or Shift-Control-MediaEject doesn't really put a Mac to sleep; it only puts the built-in display on a Mac laptop to sleep.  It looks like either Barry misunderstood me back in May, or I didn't make it clear that I wanted to put my MBP to sleep.  I believed Barry because he's a second-level Apple Support guy, but also because the combination he gave me causes the lights behind the MBP's built-in KB to go out and the Sleep light to come on—which seemed to me to indicate the computer has gone to sleep.

     
    I only found out differently because someone made a post 27 September on an Ars Technica Mac Ach thread that said some keyboard shortcuts have been eliminated in macOS 10.12.  I replied with a post expressing concern about whether Shift-Control-MediaEject would continue to put my MBP to sleep, and was told that that keyboard shortcut doesn't do what I thought it did.  I confirmed that by looking at the Apple Knowledge Base article on keyboard shortcuts (which I had previously been unable to find via the Apple Menu) the replying post linked to, and also by phoning Apple Support—from whom I learned that the lights behind the keyboard are linked to the built-in display rather than the HDD.
     
    I've learned of a substitute workaround that seems to work for tower Macs (and maybe iMacs) as well as notebook Macs.  The workaround is to push the Power button on a computer one time after the CS782DP KVM switch has already been switched to the other computer.  I tested this on my 2010 Mac Pro tower—to verify that pushing the Power button once puts the Mac Pro to sleep, as well as on my Early 2011 MacBook Pro—to verify that pushing the Power button after the CS782DP has already been switched doesn't inhibit my LED Cinema Display from showing the G4's screen.
     
    However last night (28 September) I determined that Wake-on-LAN by the Mac Pro "backup server" also doesn't work (a -519 error, which would be a -530 error after the #6080 fix) if my MBP client has been put to sleep by pushing the keyboard Power button once, which means that pushing that button does something more than what Ctrl+Shift+Eject on the MBP's keyboard does.  The Retrospect incremental backup I did this morning (29 September a.m.) confirmed that by backing up a sleepimage file; I remember it did backup that file starting in February when I began using the Sleep option on the Apple Menu, but it hasn't backed it up since I started using Ctrl+Shift+Eject in May.
     
    The bottom line is that Wake-on-LAN doesn't work at all for my MBP client, running the Retrospect 12.0 client under OS X 10.10.5 Yosemite, from my Mac Pro running Retrospect 12.5 under OS X 10.10.5.  This may be a peculiarity of my Retrospect and OS X installations, but from other users' reports I don't think I'm the only one for whom this is the case.

  6. Technical Support does not write the Retrospect User's Guide. This is handled by a different team of people in the company which includes Product Management and Engineering. That same team currently writes most of the KB articles.

     

     

    I was informed that Technical Support does write the Retrospect User's Guide by whoever picked up the phone at the Retrospect Inc. Tech Support extension on 22 September.  You'd better straighten him out, Mayoff.

     

    Whatever other team writes the User's Guide, and most of the KB articles, had better get busy.  My criticisms and suggestion in previous posts in this thread are as valid as ever.


  7. I started to investigate this before Lennart Thelander wrote his post, but quit to take a shower while my "Sun.-Fri. Backup" script ran.  When I got back and saw his post, I tried what he suggested but it didn't work for me on Retrospect Mac 12.5 under OS X 10.10.5.  Anyway, here's what looks like it will work, assuming you know where all the Members of your deleted Media Set are and their sequence:

     

    First, try to do an Add of your deleted Media Set from the Media Set pane of the Console.   If you have spelled it exactly as it was before—which you should, you will get a -2262 error because the catalog file for your formerly-cataloged Media Set is still in the location of its catalog.  Click the Choose button in the dialog for the -2262 error, and it will show you the hierarchical location of of that catalog file, which is probably boot-drive/Library/Application Support/Retrospect/Catalogs.  Write it down, just cancel the hierarchical location dialog but leave the dialog with the -2262 error message up, then go to the written-down location in the Finder and delete that .rbc catalog file.  Then go back into the Console, Add that Media Set again using the dialog that is still up, but cancel the Add a new member to this Media Set dialog.

     

    Now go to page 220 in the Retrospect 13.0 User's Guide, and follow the "Rebuilding a Media Set" procedure.  Be sure to do each Add Member in the same sequence that member was created.

     

    Finally, and very important, immediately put the re-Added Media Set back into all your scripts where it was used.  This means not only re-checkmarking the Media Set in the Media Set panel of each script that is supposed to use it, but also adding back any Schedules for a script that designated that particular Media Set—and adjusting other schedules for that script accordingly.  See the new third paragraph of my post directly below this for the consequences of not doing it.  

     

    Good luck, and please post back to let us know how it worked.

     

    P.S.: Revised last two sentences in second paragraph to make re-Adding the Media Set even more foolproof.

     

    P.P.S: Added very important fourth paragraph about immediately putting the re-Added Media Set back into your Scripts.  


  8. Just one point of clarification, and I'm not taking sides in the main part of this post.

     

    In almost all software companies, the support organization does not write User Guides and similar materials. That should be done as part of the new product development process by a group that might be called "technical documentation" or "documentation" or something similar. 

     

    x509

     

     

    Please, I'm well aware of the way it is done in most software companies, so before writing my preceding post in this thread I phoned Retrospect Support yesterday to double-check—briefly—on who writes the User's Guides at Retrospect Inc..  The man I spoke to, who was probably A. since he didn't sound like Mayoff, told me Retrospect Support writes the Guides.  When I explained that I was asking in order to write a post on the Retrospect Forums, he—obviously knowing once I told him my name who I am—told me "Have fun".

     

    I could speculate why Retrospect Support does the technical documentation, but to avoid making Mayoff justifiably unhappy with this post I won't do that.  Use your imagination, x509, but let's not talk about it on these forums.  All I will say is that IME being overworked doesn't necessarily make one do things the most intelligent way, and that's the underlying point of all three of my preceding posts in this thread.


  9. ....

     

    .... Yes, you've got an article in the Knowledge Base that does that, but how likely is someone in the "consumer market" to find it?  The only link to that article (which I have intentionally not provided here so that readers can experience the effort) is in a "see details" in the "Release Notes" documents for Mac and Windows—and that's where I finally found out how to do Cloud backup to Dropbox!

     

    ....

     

    In particular, for Retrospect Mac 13.5 the seamless integration of Dropbox apparently is done by adding a third—Dropbox—choice to the dropdown at the top of the new Member Type dialog that was added to Mac 13.0 for the Cloud Media Set Type.  ....  Of course it's possible that there is a separate version of the Member Type dialog that is generated when an unmentioned new "Dropbox" option is chosen in the top dropdown of the Add Media Set dialog, but the Knowledge Base article is so sketchily written that I can't determine whether that possibility is true.

     

    ....

     

    ....

     

     

    OK, let's look at the Knowledge Base article "Cloud Backup - How to Set Up Dropbox for Cloud Backup" here.  Under the "Mac Interface" sub-section of the "Adding Cloud Storage in Retrospect" section, the text numbered 1 says "Select 'Dropbox' from the dropdown menu and click 'Log into Dropbox'."  Immediately under that text is a screenshot of a Member Type dialog, but that Member Type dialog has additional fields starting with "Authorize Retrospect to use your Dropbox account" that aren't in the screenshot of the Member Type dialog at the equivalent section (near the bottom) in e.g. the Knowledge Base article "Cloud Backup - How to Set Up Amazon S3 for Cloud Backup" here—and vice-versa.  What causes the proper format of Member Type dialog to appear?  Does it change when the dropdown at the top of the Member Type dialog is set to "Dropbox"?  But that would mean that the user would initially see the Amazon-S3-style version of the Member Type dialog, and would have to be told  to first select "Dropbox" in the top dropdown to cause the dialog to switch to the Dropbox version.  Or is it determined when an unmentioned new "Dropbox" option is chosen in the top dropdown of the Add Media Set dialog?

     

    Since so far Retrospect Support has not produced Mac and Windows video tutorials on this subject, I can't deduce the answer (and—as before with Retrospect Mac 13.0—I won't have a copy of Retrospect Mac 13.5 to try it out).  That means that, unlike what I did for Retrospect Mac 13.0, I won't be able to contribute to a forum thread on the subject.  That will mean either 1) more phone calls to Retrospect Support or 2) more potential users saying Retrospect Mac 13.5 doesn't really work with Dropbox—and demanding their money back.  I don't think you want either of these outcomes, Mayoff, so it would be in your own interest  to improve the article.

     

    IMHO, behind the deficiencies of the Knowledge Base article, and the deficiencies of the equivalent section on Cloud Backup in Chapter 1 of the Retrospect Mac 13.0 User's Guide, is a basic mis-step by Retrospect Support.  That mis-step is trying to combine documentation of new features for Retrospect Mac and Retrospect Windows into a single overall piece of text—even though they are versions of the same features that have different UIs.  Copy/Cut-and-paste was introduced to the general IT world in 1984 with the first Mac, and was quickly adopted in Windows and Linux.  Using it, Retrospect Support should not have to spend much effort in converting those combined texts into separate Mac and Windows versions for their respective User's Guides.  Because that separation will make each of the texts shorter, it will be easier for Retrospect Support to see and correct deficiencies such as the one above.  The shorter OS-specific texts will also be easier to move to appropriate more-detailed chapters further back in the User's Guides.

     

    P.S.: Inserted new next-to-last sentence in my first paragraph under the quote, to clarify the shortcomings of the Knowledge Base article on Dropbox.


  10. ....

    Nothing was done in a "hurry". We are offering Dropbox support because it is a very popular cloud storage platform and support was requested by a very large number of customers. Dropbox is a great solution for the consumer market.

    ...

    ....

     

     

    First, I congratulate the Retrospect Inc. engineers on integrating Dropbox so seamlessly into the preceding release's Cloud enhancement—which interfaced only to AWS-S3-compatible cloud providers.  Considering that Dropbox doesn't even support WebDAV without third-party add-ons, IMHO they did an exceptional job in getting Retrospect Mac 13.5 and Retrospect Windows 11.5 out in less than six months.  However I take the preceding sentence back; Dropbox is apparently S3-compatible even though it isn't WebDAV-compatible.

     

    I wish I could say equally good things about Retrospect Support—which I assume is responsible for documentation.  Mayoff, my grandmother taught me when I was 3 years old "You're not done until you've finished the paperwork."  The new releases have been out for a full week, but the User's Guides have not been updated.  Moreover, the "What's New" documents under http://www.retrospect.com/en/support/documentation only announce that the new releases can do Cloud backup to Dropbox; they don't tell a user how to do it.  Yes, you've got an article in the Knowledge Base that does that, but how likely is someone in the "consumer market" to find it?  The only link to that article (which I have intentionally not provided here so that readers can experience the effort) is in a "see details" in the "Release Notes" documents for Mac and Windows—and that's where I finally found out how to do Cloud backup to Dropbox!

     

    When you get around to updating the User's Guides, are you going to have the "What's New" chapter contain links to your various articles on Cloud backup to various providers?  That might not be such a bad idea, except that any user who might have downloaded a User's Guide as a .PDF to his/her "backup server" would have to have a web browser open while working from it.  Alternatively, you could copy the contents of the 13.0/11.0 "What's New" chapter to appropriate chapters in the main part of the User's Guide, and then copy the contents of the Knowledge Base article on Dropbox to the new "What's New" chapter.  Considering that part of the article repeats Cloud procedures that are already in the 13.0/11.0 User's Guide, you could replace a good part of the article contents with in-document links when copying it.

     

    In particular, for Retrospect Mac 13.5 the seamless integration of Dropbox apparently is done by adding a third—Dropbox—choice to the dropdown at the top of the new Member Type dialog that was added to Mac 13.0 for the Cloud Media Set Type.  Retrospect Inc. totally omitted an explanation of that Member Type dialog in the "Cloud Backup" section of 13.0's "Chapter 1 • What's New" (the dialog is simply pictured on page 9), which is why I had to provide an explanation of the use of that dialog for "seeding" and "restore to door" in the next-to-last sentence of the second paragraph in this 4 March 2016 post—in a thread that probably became wildly popular because of that one-sentence explanation (and my expansion of it into a step-by-step procedure in a subsequent post in the same thread).  You can add that explanation—which I suggested in the second paragraph of that same post could have been as short as three sentences—to the contents of the 13.0/11.0 "What's New" chapter when you move it to appropriate chapters in the 13.5/11.5 User's Guides, and then in-document-link to it in your explanation of the Dropbox variant of that dialog in the forthcoming 13.5/11.5 "Chapter 1 • What's New".  Of course it's possible that there is a separate version of the Member Type dialog that is generated when an unmentioned new "Dropbox" option is chosen in the top dropdown of the Add Media Set dialog, but the Knowledge Base article is so sketchily written that I can't determine whether that possibility is true.

     

    Second, Mayoff, you're going to have to tell even "consumer market" users that they are certainly going to have to purchase a Dropbox Pro upgrade—to a separate Dropbox account whose space can be used exclusively for backup—for $99 per year.  An ordinary free Dropbox account only gives you 2GB of cloud storage; even I—with my peculiar weekly-offsite-rotation backup routine—backup 205GB from my 6 drives each week.  Even the 1TB available with a Dropbox Pro account would be limiting for some "consumer market" users who maintain archival backups.

     

    And, on that subject, we get back to the vexing problem of how to cut down an existing disk-based archival backup to below 1TB so a "consumer market" user can slowly Internet-upload it to a Dropbox Pro account.  I don't think a "consumer market" user is going to be willing to buy one or more large-capacity disks just for a single Copy Backup run.  You'll find my suggestions on that problem in this thread.

     

    P.S.: Inserted fourth paragraph suggesting a specific strategy for the Dropbox explanation that needs to be added to the User's Guide.

     

    P.P.S.: Revised first paragraph to give less kudos to Retrospect Inc. Engineering; Dropbox is Amazon-S3-compatible.


  11. Just wondered if anyone can help me justify the cost of the latest Retrospect upgrade to Mac13.

     

    ....

     

    And then there is DROPBOX.

    Retrospect has proudly announced that it is now a Dropbox Partner. As a Dropbox user I was keen to see how I can use the new set up. Basically I can't...

    As a small business with just 2 Macs I would need to use Dropbox for Business. Dropbox for Business is not really what it states. On the website is says – see below – which is a completely misleading statement as far as I'm concerned.

    ''file saving and sharing tool for as little as £9.17/user/month.''

    Silly me thinking that I could sign us both up to Dropbox for Business but then you get hit with the news that it has a minimum of 5 users and is £500 per year.

     

    Is it me or did the website say £9.17 per user per month?

     

    SO, with ...  the outrageous misleading statement from Dropbox for Business we are beaten in to submission and won't be using either.

     

    ....

     

    ....

     

     

    I have a strong feeling that what the Dropbox website was referring to is a service other than Dropbox Business—namely Dropbox Pro as described in the second section of this page.  "Dropbox Pro is a paid subscription that includes 1 TB of space and additional features. You can choose to subscribe monthly or annually."  When I click the link at the bottom of that section, it takes me to a page that says I can update my free Dropbox account—which it knows about—to Dropbox Pro for US$9.99 per month or US$99 per year.  US$9.99 per month sounds like the equivalent of £9.17 per month, but I can't make that page switch to another account or country.

     

    Since "seeding" is not available for Dropbox, andymac should read the fifth paragraph of this post, and then follow the link in that paragraph to find a procedure for cutting his presumed existing Retrospect backup down to 1TB or less.  There is a rewrite of that procedure into step-by-step in the next post in that linked-to thread. andymac will have to adapt steps 3) through 7) to whatever procedures Retrospect Inc. eventually puts into the Mac 13.5 User's Guide for using Dropbox instead of an AWS-S3-compatible cloud service.

     

    BTW, andymac should be aware of a rather neat concept that underlies Retrospect for cloud services, which is that the only computer that communicates with the cloud is the Retrospect "backup server"—not the computers running the Retrospect Client software.  This is what I have termed the "second-level client" concept.  It means that—to "avoid any Imperial complications"—he should setup a separate Dropbox Pro account for cloud backup from his "backup server" computer, distinct from any free Dropbox account he may already be using between his machines.  

     

    Good luck!


  12. Retrospect Inc. must have been in a hurry to get the Dropbox enhancement out, probably because there have been several recent threads on these forums implicitly complaining about the cost of AWS-compatible cloud services.

     

    In fact they were so anxious to trumpet the Dropbox enhancement that, in the latest What's New in Retrospect web page, the first row of icons under the "Cloud Storage" heading now has the phrase "Google Cloud Storage" appearing underneath twice—the leftmost appearance underneath the icon for Amazon Web Services.  Either Retrospect Inc. has intentionally soured on AWS, or they messed up while hurriedly altering a copy of the Mac 13.0 announcement.


  13. >Product Suggestions—Mac OS X, but IME nobody at Retrospect Inc. pays any attention to that forum

     

    This is not correct. The product feature request sections are reviewed regularly by product management and Retrospect engineering.

     

     

    That would be a lot more believable if—as I have suggested here on 14 April 2016—someone in Retrospect Inc. product management or engineering replied to each feature request in one two sentences either "This good idea was/will be implemented" or "This was judged to not be a good idea" or "This was judged to be a good idea, but too much work to be implemented".  It would give the Retrospect Inc. reviewer something to do with his/her fingers while reviewing.

     

    It's called "feedback to the customer".  You could take a Marketing course that discusses it.

    • Like 1

  14. The automatically repeated updating notice, which continued even after I had done the update,  turned out to be from Adobe Flash Player Install Manager.app.  I deleted the install app.  I then reran the same tests early this morning.  I got a -519 error on the first test, but the second test ran fine.

     

    My guess is that, on my MBP, letting the computer go to sleep after 1 hour temporarily disables the Retrospect Client.  This may have something to do with my now having an ATEN CS782DP KVM switch, but I didn't have that switch in February.

     

     

    After disconnecting the ATEN CS782DP KeyboardVideoMouse switch from my MacBook Pro, repeated the same two tests early this morning.  Got exactly the same results: "Sun.-Fri. Backup" script got a -519 error (which would be a -530 error after #6080 fix) with the MBP having gone to sleep after one hour per revised System Preferences->Energy Saver options, but ran fine with the MBP awake.

     

    So—after eliminating oddities such as simultaneous Adobe updater messages—the results for Wake-on-LAN for my MBP seem to be: works fine when a Mac laptop client is put to sleep via a special keyboard combination on the laptop keyboardfails with a -519 error (which would be a -530 error after #6080 fix) when a Mac client automatically goes to sleep per System Preferences->Energy Saver optionsfails with a -519 error (which would be a -530 error after #6080 fix) when a Mac client is put to sleep via the Apple Menu

     

    To me that sounds as if presumably greater OS X involvement in the second and third cases is what causes Wake-on-LAN to fail on my MBP.  That may not apply to other peoples' Mac clients with their own installations of OS X.

     

    P.S.: Just noticed (on 18 September) a bug fix for Retrospect Mac 13.0.1 "Fixed issue where clients not found on network incorrectly reported as error -519 instead of -530 (#6080)"; put in parenthetical note after every mention of -519 in this post—no doubt you should mentally do the same for previous posts in this thread.


  15. Retrospect has for a number of years supported the WebDAV cloud interface.  However the Retrospect Inc. documentation is nearly non-existent, probably because methods of using the WebDAV interface differ so much from service to service.  A few weeks ago someone asked about using box.com in this thread on the Windows Professional forum, so I did a little searching and put together posts #6 and #7 there.  Post #6 may be helpful for services other than box.com.

     

    It does not appear that Amazon Cloud Drive by itself supports WebDAV.  Amazon of course has Amazon AWS, which Retrospect Mac 13 supports, but that—as I'm sure you realize—is more expensive than Amazon Cloud.  If you do a little searching with a web search engine such as Google, you will find add-on products that say they add a WebDAV interface to Amazon Cloud.  Your Mileage May Vary (spelled-out because the second sentence of your OP makes it seem that English is not your native language).

     

    Good luck, and please reply with what you discover.


  16. Received this reply to my case's Additional Notes—which were the contents of my early-morning-15-September post above—from Retrospect Support this morning (15 September):

     

    "Agent Response: 

    We do have open bugs for users getting -559 and 505 errors at random times during backup, but for most users they are not related to Wake on LAN operations.  I will pass your experience onto our engineers so it is included in the bug report for those errors."

     

    I'm going to retry the same tests overnight, but with my ATEN CS782DP KeyboardMouseVideo switch disconnected from my MacBook Pro—to see if that makes any difference.


  17. Last night in my MacBook Pro's System Preferences->Energy  Saver, I changed both Computer Sleep and Display Sleep to 1 hour, and left it running. Early this morning, after verifying by there being no longer any light under the KB that the MBP had gone to sleep, I booted my Mac Pro "backup server".  The scheduled "Sun.-Fri. Backup" got the the following log:

     

    Normal backup using Sun.-Fri. Backup at 9/14/16, 3:36:55 AM

        To Backup Set Media Set White...

       

        9/14/16 3:37:17 AM: Connected to David’s MacBook Pro

        *  Resolved container David’s MacBook Pro to 1 volumes:

        Macintosh HD on David’s MacBook Pro

        -  9/14/16 3:36:55 AM: Copying Macintosh HD on David’s MacBook Pro

        Using Instant Scan

        9/14/16 3:38:17 AM: Found: 626898 files, 150652 folders, 46.6 GB

        9/14/16 3:39:21 AM: Finished matching

        soccRecv: recv failed, error 60

        9/14/16 3:39:46 AM: Copying: 1760 files (3.6 GB) and 0 hard links

        !Trouble reading files, error -559 (network connection timeout)

        9/14/16 3:39:53 AM: Execution incomplete

        ....

     

    I then pressed the Shift key on the attached USB KB to wake up the MBP, and manually ran "Sun.-Fri. Backup" again to get the following log:

     

    Normal backup using Sun.-Fri. Backup at 9/14/16, 3:44:32 AM

        To Backup Set Media Set White...

        Can't access backup client David’s MacBook Pro, error -505 (backup client reserved)

        9/14/16 3:44:54 AM: Execution incomplete

     

    I noticed that there was an automatically repeated updating notice for Adobe Reader (after I had already updated it) on the MBP's monitor.  

     

    ....

     

    I will reboot my MBP now to see if that gets rid of the Adobe message—which has caused -505 trouble in the past. I will then retry the same test overnight.

     

     

    The automatically repeated updating notice, which continued even after I had done the update,  turned out to be from Adobe Flash Player Install Manager.app.  I deleted the install app.  I then reran the same tests early this morning.  I got a -519 error on the first test, but the second test ran fine.

     

    My guess is that, on my MBP, letting the computer go to sleep after 1 hour temporarily disables the Retrospect Client.  This may have something to do with my now having an ATEN CS782DP KVM switch, but I didn't have that switch in February.


  18. Since this is a thread about the cost of Retrospect cloud backup, and since Mayoff may read it, I'll take the liberty of making one post justifying a cost-saving suggestion I posted back in March 2016.  I have now made the suggestion official with a thread in Product Suggestions—Mac OS X, but IME nobody at Retrospect Inc. pays any attention to that forum.  However to avoid choppiness here I won't duplicate links to other threads that are in my linked-to post.

     

    Trigger warning: Reading the next four paragraphs of this post will undoubtedly cause you to at least slap your forehead, when you consider that Retrospect Inc. ignored that suggestion in the Mac 13.5/Windows 11.5 update.

     

    jethro started a thread on March 2nd—one day after Retrospect Mac 13.0 was released—saying "we'd love to augment our existing backup with maybe a weekly data transfer to a cloud storage as a backup of our onsite backup (we'd want our local HD backup to still be primary and work as-is).  .... The total space used for ALL backups (which goes back 4 years now) is about 5TB, spread across 4 hard drives. .... We might be fine transferring either just current data forward, or maybe everything back to a year or so ago ...."  I responded on March 8th with a post setting out a step-by-step procedure by which he could do that.  That thread has become wildly popular, which presumably means that many people want to do the same kind of cloud backup.  

     

    My procedure assumed jethro would do "seeding" of his existing on-site backup data.  By the time WKTimes started a similar thread on September 7th, it had become obvious that "seeding" was now only available—directly or indirectly—from two cloud providers, and costs US$230 and up.  Therefore I rewrote the procedure assuming "seeding" would be replaced by a lengthy Internet upload to the cloud account.  WKTimes only wants to permanently maintain the last two weeks of backups in the cloud, but I told him Retrospect can't groom below a one-month minimum.

     

    The key point is that the first two steps of both versions of my procedure are:

    1) Create a new local Disk or Cloud-with-Disk-local-member Media Set [Disk for non-"seeding", Cloud-with-Disk-local-member for "seeding], specifying "Groom to Retrospect defined policy" with Months to keep = n [n = 12 for jethro, n = 1 for WKTimes].   Choose Performance-optimized grooming.  This would have to be as big as your regular backup Media Set.

    2) Run a Copy Media Set script to copy your regular Media Set to the new local Disk Media Set, with the option Match Source Media Set to destination Media Set unchecked and the option Copy Backups checked.  You will have to Groom the new Media Set afterwards.

     

    That means that jethro would have to buy a 6TB disk drive to be the destination of the Copy Media Set—even though he would immediately be doing grooming to cut the contents down to less than 1TB.  That would have cost him more than US$300 (it's now down to $200 as of September 15th).  WKTimes would also have to buy disk(s) equal in capacity to his regular backup, which "is 'very large' and partially off-site"—even though he would immediately be doing grooming to cut the contents down to the last four weeks.  

     

    How about that excess expense for cloud backup?


  19. Received this reply to my case from Retrospect Support this morning (13 September):

     

    "Agent Response: 

    The Wake on LAN feature is tested with every Retrospect product release. Retrospect 11/13 was released in March and we have really not had any significant reports of trouble with the feature. In fact, I think you are probably the only customer who has been directly asking support about it in the last few months (outside of how to turn the options on). When testing sleep, we typically test after the machine has automatically gone to sleep, since that is what the majority of customers experience. 

     

    ....

    ...."

     

    I have both those options on.  I am using Retrospect Mac 12.5, with version 12.0.2 (116) of the Retrospect Client on my MacBook Pro; I mentioned both those version numbers in my Support case—which is pretty much a copy of my posts in this thread.

     

    The only thing I can speculate at this point is that a machine automatically going to sleep might not have the same effect as putting it to Sleep on the Apple menu.  In my MBP's System Preferences->Energy  Saver, I have both Computer Sleep and Display Sleep set to Never;  I also have Wake for Network Access checkmarked in that same Preferences pane.

     

     

    Last night in my MacBook Pro's System Preferences->Energy  Saver, I changed both Computer Sleep and Display Sleep to 1 hour, and left it running. Early this morning, after verifying by there being no longer any light under the KB that the MBP had gone to sleep, I booted my Mac Pro "backup server".  The scheduled "Sun.-Fri. Backup" got the the following log:

     

    Normal backup using Sun.-Fri. Backup at 9/14/16, 3:36:55 AM

        To Backup Set Media Set White...

       

        9/14/16 3:37:17 AM: Connected to David’s MacBook Pro

        *  Resolved container David’s MacBook Pro to 1 volumes:

        Macintosh HD on David’s MacBook Pro

        -  9/14/16 3:36:55 AM: Copying Macintosh HD on David’s MacBook Pro

        Using Instant Scan

        9/14/16 3:38:17 AM: Found: 626898 files, 150652 folders, 46.6 GB

        9/14/16 3:39:21 AM: Finished matching

        soccRecv: recv failed, error 60

        9/14/16 3:39:46 AM: Copying: 1760 files (3.6 GB) and 0 hard links

        !Trouble reading files, error -559 (network connection timeout)

        9/14/16 3:39:53 AM: Execution incomplete

        Remaining: 1,760 files, 3.6 GB

        Completed: 0 files, 0 B

        Performance: 0 MB/minute

        Duration: 00:02:58 (00:02:49 idle/loading/preparing)

     

    I then pressed the Shift key on the attached USB KB to wake up the MBP, and manually ran "Sun.-Fri. Backup" again to get the following log:

     

    Normal backup using Sun.-Fri. Backup at 9/14/16, 3:44:32 AM

        To Backup Set Media Set White...

        Can't access backup client David’s MacBook Pro, error -505 (backup client reserved)

        9/14/16 3:44:54 AM: Execution incomplete

     

    I noticed that there was an automatically repeated updating notice for Adobe Reader (after I had already updated it) on the MBP's monitor.  

     

    I then stopped-started Retrospect Client on the MBP, and manually ran "Sun.-Fri. Backup" again.  This time it ran fine.

     

    I will reboot my MBP now to see if that gets rid of the Adobe message—which has caused -505 trouble in the past. I will then retry the same test overnight.


  20. Received this reply to my case from Retrospect Support this morning (13 September):

     

    "Agent Response: 

    The Wake on LAN feature is tested with every Retrospect product release. Retrospect 11/13 was released in March and we have really not had any significant reports of trouble with the feature. In fact, I think you are probably the only customer who has been directly asking support about it in the last few months (outside of how to turn the options on). When testing sleep, we typically test after the machine has automatically gone to sleep, since that is what the majority of customers experience. 

    Wake on LAN is supported on Macintosh and Windows with normal backup scripts and proactive backup scripts.  The option must be turned on in the client properties screen and turned on inside the script options. 

    Wake on LAN is not supported with the 6.3 client version.
    "

     

    I have both those options on.  I am using Retrospect Mac 12.5, with version 12.0.2 (116) of the Retrospect Client on my MacBook Pro; I mentioned both those version numbers in my Support case—which is pretty much a copy of my posts in this thread.

     

    The only thing I can speculate at this point is that a machine automatically going to sleep might not have the same effect as putting it to Sleep on the Apple menu.  In my MBP's System Preferences->Energy  Saver, I have both Computer Sleep and Display Sleep set to Never;  I also have Wake for Network Access checkmarked in that same Preferences pane.


  21. This is a rewrite of paragraphs 2, 4, and 5 of the preceding post for the "if you can't do 'seeding'" case, based on merging them into a copy of part C) of this post.  You would want to do the following things:

     

    1)  Create a new local Disk Media Set, specifying "Groom to Retrospect defined policy" with  Months to keep = 1.   Choose Performance-optimized grooming.  This would have to be as big as your regular backup Media Set, unless and until—as I have newly officially suggestedRetrospect Inc. implements an age subset of the "Groom to Retrospect defined policy" option in Copy Media Set with a Disk (not just Cloud) Media Set as destination for Retrospect Mac Ver. 13.5.  It would be nice if there were a Weeks to keep alternative you could set to 2, but there isn't.

     

    2)  Run a Copy Media Set script to copy your regular Media Set to the new local Disk Media Set, with the option Match Source Media Set to destination Media Set unchecked and the option Copy Backups checked  The resultant size—after grooming—should give you a fairly good estimate of the amount of storage you would need in the cloud; get/put requests I don't know about.  If the size of the new Cloud Media Set local disk member is the same as your regular Media set—which it will be except in the unlikely case that Retrospect does the multi-cycling copying-grooming I suggested it might do in sentences 3 through 5 of the first paragraph of this post, you will have to Groom the new Media Set afterwards—or else use a Rule in the Copy Media Set to do the equivalent of grooming.

     

    3)  Meanwhile make the arrangements to setup your cloud account, and keep the account  parameters handy.

     

    4) Create a new Cloud Media Set with a Cloud member, specifying 'Groom to Retrospect defined policy' with Months to keep = 1 and specifying Performance-optimized grooming, and type in the account parameters you have kept handy.

     

    5) Run a Copy Media Set script to copy your new groomed local Disk Media Set to the new Cloud Media Set, with the option Match Source Media Set to destination Media Set unchecked and the option Copy Backups checked.  Check No Verification.  Actually running this script may take hours or days—which is why "seeding" would have been preferable, but thanks to the glories of using the "backup server" as a "second-level client" you can run it over the weekend—or in a separate thread unless you have Retrospect Desktop Edition.  

     

    6) Setup a new Copy Backup script to copy from your regular Media Set to the new Cloud media set, this time with the option Match Source Media Set to destination Media Set checked.  Check No Verification.  Schedule the new Copy Backup daily, at whatever time you want.

     

    7) Schedule a Groom of the new Cloud Media Set to run once every 2 months.

    P.S: Changed my answer to step 2 to say that Copy Media Set can use a Rule as an alternative to grooming per this post.


  22. It sounds to me as if you have some variant of the same requirements that jethro had in this thread.  I would suggest that you consider modifying the procedures in part C) of this post in that thread.

     

    The first modification you would have to make to the linked-to procedures is in step C1), where you would have to change Months to keep = 1.  It would be nice if there were a Weeks to keep alternative you could set to 2, but there isn't.  Also, in step C1) choose Performance-optimized grooming if you have an option; it will AFAIK be the only option if you are doing "seeding".

     

    Whether you would have to make a second modification depends on whether your cloud provider has a "seeding" service, such as I assumed in steps C1) through C5).  Retrospect Mac 13 has provided a neat feature for "seeding" that I assumed back in March 2016 would be used, but I have since learned that only two cloud providers offer any version of "seeding".  Amazon AWS offers "seeding" via a beefed-up large-capacity Snowball drive that they lend to you, but that costs $200 for a 50TB drive plus $30 per TB "seeded".  Iron Mountain offers a "seeding" service for Google Cloud, but it appears that their service involves their doing a high-speed Internet upload to Google of the data from disks/tapes you send to Iron Mountain—and it almost certainly ain't cheap.  Other than that, it appears that no other cloud provider has a "seeding" service.  Of course you could setup Basho Riak S2 on a dedicated server per D) and do your own "seeding", but if you were doing that I assume you would have mentioned it.  If you can live without "seeding", you might consider using DreamHost with Retrospect Inc.'s special deal, under which Cloud storage would only cost you $20/month/TB instead of $30/month/TB with Amazon or Google.

     

    Let's assume that you can't do "seeding", so that you would have to modify steps C1) through C6) in the linked-to procedures.  First, do the modification to step C1) in the second paragraph of this post.  Second, in steps C1) and C2), replace "Cloud Media Set" with "new local Disk Media Set".  This would have to be as big as your regular backup Media Set, unless and until (as I have newly officially suggested) Retrospect Inc. implements an age subset of the "Groom to Retrospect defined policy" option in Copy Media Set with a Disk (not just Cloud) Media Set as destination for Retrospect Mac Ver. 13.5—or else you use a Rule in the Copy Media Set to do the equivalent of grooming..  Third, in step C2) (unless and until you are using a forthcoming Retrospect Mac 13.5 with my suggested feature) you will definitely have to Groom the new Media Set afterwards—or else use a Rule in the Copy Media Set to do the equivalent of grooming.  Fourth, in step C3) omit the drive-shipping operation.  Fifth, in step C4) replace everything prior to typing in the account parameters with "Create a new Cloud Media Set with a Cloud member, specifying 'Groom to Retrospect defined policy' with Months to keep = 1 and specifying Performance-optimized grooming".  Sixth, replace step C5) with "Run a Copy Media Set script to copy your new groomed local Disk Media Set to the new Cloud Media Set, with the option Match Source Media Set to destination Media Set unchecked and the option Copy Backups checked.  Check No Verification."   Actually running this script may take hours or days—which is why "seeding" would have been preferable, but thanks to the glories of using the "backup server" as a "second-level client" you can run it over the weekend—or in a separate thread unless you have Retrospect Desktop Edition.  Seventh, in step C6) replace weekly with daily.  

     

    Finally, whether or not you can do "seeding", add a new step C7) that says to schedule a Groom script for the new Cloud Media Set to run once every two months.

     

    Disclaimer: I've never done any of the above stuff; all I did was to read the Mac User's Guide and look at a couple of Tutorials.

     

    P.S.: Lowered pricing for Amazon AWS Snowball "seeding".  Moved step C7) to separate paragraph, indicating it must be done whether or not you do "seeding". 

     

    P.P.S.: Corrected step C7); you can schedule a Groom script to run less often than once a month.

     

    P.P.P.S: Added options and No Verification to step C5); changed step C6) to run daily.

    P.P.P.P.S: Changed my answer to step C2 to say that Copy Media Set can use a Rule as an alternative to grooming per this post.


  23. It just occurred to me that Magic Packet might not just be a Retrospect, or even Mac OS X, term.  So I did a Google search, and found it in the Wikipedia article on Wake-on-LAN.  Since that section of the article mentions the "target computer's 48-bit MAC [Media Access Control] address", it reminded me that both my client computers have static DHCP addresses set on the router—done at the direction of A. of Retrospect Support back in July 2015 to make sure the "backup server" can find them (this is not mentioned in the Retrospect Mac 13 User's Guide, so I mention that in any post on these forums where it seems appropriate).

     

    That in turn reminded me that I had done a Sources->Locate immediately after both of the first two cases described in the first paragraph of post#7 in this thread.  In both cases, put to sleep via the Apple Menu and put to sleep via a special keyboard combination on the laptop keyboard, Locate failed.  I did Locate after the tests because, when I ran the test for the second case first—expecting it to fail, it unexpectedly succeeded (I then ran Locate after the test for the first case, because my experience has shown that running Locate before a script usually causes it to succeed when it would otherwise fail with a -530 error.) 

     

    Thinking of this just now caused me to wonder if some setting in my Internet-facing router might inhibit Magic Packets, thus inhibiting Retrospect Wake-from-LAN.  I do not have any software firewalls on any of my LAN computers, nor do I have an internal router on my LAN.

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