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DavidHertzberg

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Everything posted by DavidHertzberg

  1. Some other Wikipedia editors complained that "the article contains excessive detail, it's written more like an essay or exposition than an cut-and-dried encyclopedia article, and the sourcing doesn't really support a lot of the inferences and asides". DovidBenAvraham took care of the inferences and asides by essentially eliminating the "Documentation" section; it made inferences (most of which are now preserved in this Mac Forum post) mostly by comparing current versions of Retrospect Mac User's Guides to past versions of the same UGs, to the same versions of the Retrospect Windows UGs, to buttons in the Retrospect Mac GUI, or to the Tutorials or Knowledge Base articles. Those comparisons by editors are considered un-sourced "original research" in the Wikipedia world, but it's OK for an editor to report on such comparisons if they were made by a third-party reviewer. However these other editors are now strong-arming DovidBenAvraham to rewrite the rest of the article, under the threat of doing it themselves if he doesn't. That rewriting will be done over the next few days. When it's complete and has passed muster with the complaining editors, I'll go through the posts on these forums and revise them so that they link to the new appropriate sections in the article. Here's a permanent link to the article in its old form.
  2. henry-in-florida, Thank you for pointing this out, but you ought to know by now that nobody from Retrospect Inc. reads this sub-forum anymore. Here's why and how to file a Support Request for a bug fix.
  3. organisum, I guess it's time to tell you to "RTFM". Pages 158-160 of the Retrospect 15 Mac User's Guide provide complete "Email Preferences" instructions, including an "Outgoing mail server" paragraph that tells you how to specify the TCP/IP port—using an SMTP server as an example. I found this by the extremely secret technique of doing a browser search of the UG for "email"; it showed up as the second such occurrence in the Table of Contents. The same paragraph is in the UG for Retrospect Mac 12, in case you're not running the latest version—which BTW you didn't specify. Doing the same browser search in the Knowledge Base turns up this article, which says "you will need to include a platform-specific port after the SMTP server name" in the first paragraph and has a "Port Configuration" section. That article appears to have been updated for the "... Supports SSL" checkbox—which BTW is not mentioned to this day in the UG but which defaults to checked—in connection with the release of Retrospect Mac 12. However the "Troubleshooting" section has been updated in connection with the release of Retrospect 15, which explains why the current version of the article is dated 15 May 2018. This OP in another thread may explain why the KB article was updated.
  4. DavidHertzberg

    No more instant scan on MacOS?

    insont, I agree with your general conclusion. This post in another thread, especially the P.S., discusses what the probable effect of eliminating Instant Scan would be.
  5. DavidHertzberg

    Full Access Mojave

    There's now a new 15.6 release of Retrospect, and a new version of the Knowledge Base article to go with it.
  6. Actually Monafly isn't misreading what he/she is reading in the Grooming dialog. Retrospect Mac 12 added a Months to Keep entry box to the Grooming dialog, which is described on page 9 of the Retrospect Mac 12 User's Guide. A quick test on my "backup server" shows that (as I expected for compatibility) clicking the Groom to Retrospect Defined Policy button causes Months to Keep to default to 12. Unfortunately that page was part of the "What's New" chapter, and the august Documentation Committee has adopted for the last 4 versions of the UGs a policy of totally overwriting the last version's "What's New" UG chapter with whatever is new in the current version of Retrospect—without copying the last version's "What's New" content to another UG chapter. I have mentioned that policy in other posts; a frank appraisal of it would require me to use the words "heads" and "wedged" and "up" and the third-person plural possessive of the name of the human excretory orifice, which of course I'm too polite to do.
  7. DavidHertzberg

    Full Access Mojave

    So now Retrospect Technical Support is admitting that Instant Scan is going away on Retrospect Mac 15. One problem is that Instant Scan for APFS doesn't work, which is apparently a backup-app-industry-wide problem—not just for Retrospect. Another problem is that getting Instant Scan to work seems to be currently impossible if you're booting macOS 10.14, AKA known as Mojave. But I suspect that what henry-in-florida is quoting RTS as saying is what a Greek named Aesop characterized as "sour grapes". Since I instituted Instant Scan 3 years ago, it's been saving me 8 minutes on each daily incremental backup of one drive, and about 40 minutes on each weekly Recycle backup of 3 drives (I'm actually backing up 6 drives on that weekly run, but 3 of them are on a Mac so old that its Client predates the introduction of Instant Scan). Even if the speed improvements from the introduction of 64-bit API calls double or triple copying rates, I don't believe the Instant Scan savings described in the previous sentence will become negligible. And I don't care if Instant Scan hogs CPU time. P.S.: Come to think of it, the first drive I back up weekly—which only contains about 15GB—on that very old Mac takes about 15 minutes before Retrospect 14 actually starts backing up its files (as shown by the LED on my Media Set drive starting to flash). The CPU speed on that old Digital Audio G4 is 733Mhz, 27% of the CPU speed of the 2.7Ghz MacBook Pro that I back up daily. Yet its Recycle backup-and-compare, adjusted for the 49GB contents of the HFS+ drive on my newer machine, runs at 54% of the speed for my MBP—despite the fact that the MBP's drive is an SSD. And that includes the 15-minute preliminary Scan, which cannot be Instant because OS X 10.3—which the G4 boots—did not yet have FSEvents. Considering that the weekly Recycle backup-and-compare of the G4 takes 2 hours, my guess is that eliminating Instant Scan will add about 10% to the time for each incremental backup of a modern Mac. That won't be negligible for administrators with dozens of Macs to fit into a "backup window".
  8. DavidHertzberg

    Full Access Mojave

    Nigel Smith and anyone else upgrading to Mojave, Since I don't work for Retrospect Inc., I didn't write the KB article or Retrospect Mac 15.5. Since I also don't work for Apple, I didn't write Mojave. And since I'm an old fuddy-duddy, I'm still booting Sierra—so I don't have this problem. My suggestion would be to submit a feature request; here's why and how to do it. Alternatively, if you're lucky the "upcoming (Retrospect Client) release (which) will eliminate the uninstallation step and preserve your client settings" will IMHO be out in Retrospect Mac 15.6 or 15.7 around December. If Retrospect Inc. has to get Apple to fix something in macOS, the fix will IMHO come no earlier than Retrospect 16 next March.
  9. DavidHertzberg

    Cloud Backups to Backblaze fail

    jweisbin, IMHO you should ask Retrospect Tech Support, especially since you are probably entitled to personalized advice because you have licensed Retrospect Mac 15. You could also ask Backblaze Tech Support. Have you considered Wasabi, which is quite a bit cheaper than Amazon and is S3-compatible?
  10. DavidHertzberg

    Subnet Broadcasting

    Nigel Smith, There may be a faster way of doing what you are slowly accomplishing. Look at this Tutorial for Retrospect Windows, and also at this Tutorial for Retrospect Mac. You would probably have to buy an additional network adapter for your "backup server" machine, but I think your installation can handle that from a financial and security point of view. This approach may be covered already in the User's Guides. However over the last few years the august Documentation Committee has left it to the head of Retrospect Support to document in Tutorial videos things that they were reluctant to document in the UGs or even in Knowledge Base articles. A consequent problem is that the head of Retrospect Tech Support seems compelled to keep his videos under 3 minutes, and preferably not much more than 2 minutes, because he fears losing those viewers with a short attention span.
  11. DavidHertzberg

    Full Access Mojave

    henry-in-florida, On second thought, you may have a problem if you are upgrading either your "backup server" or your "client" machine to Mojave without later upgrading your version of Retrospect to 15.5 Mac. That would be because you have a situation analogous to what I've quoted below for Backblaze: [beginning of quote] Backblaze required an update to the app as well as a manual update of permissions. To download the update, I went to the menu bar, clicked the Backblaze icon (it looks like a flame), and selected “Check for updates”. An update to the latest version of the Backblaze app was quickly downloaded and installed. A short while later, a warning message appeared on my Mac (see screenshot below): (A warning dialog from Backblaze stating that permissions are required.) Clicking Learn More directed me to this web page providing directions on how to add a specific component of Backblaze to the list of apps that get full access. This allows Backblaze to back up the Photos Library properly. Backblaze and Carbon Copy Cloner are just two of the many third-party backup apps that require attention to work properly with macOS Mojave. If you use other backup apps on your Mac, be sure to make sure they’re working properly after the Mojave update. If they’re not, visit the website of the application developer for details on how to either update to a new version or change permissions for the app in System Preferences. [end of quote] The underlying problem IMHO, henry-in-florida, is that Retrospect Inc. (and possibly predecessor developers) have long made a practice of installing the real Retrospect app in a "seekrit location" that is not in the Applications folder. Thus on my MacBook Pro "client" there is no Retrospect app in Applications, and on my Mac Pro "backup server" what's named "Retrospect.app" in Applications is the Console app—not the Engine app. If you run the Retrospect installer the way they tell you, it updates the app in the "seekrit location" as well—which if you've already installed Mojave undoubtedly says to itself "Oh, he's got Mojave, I have to give Full Disk Access to the Engine/Client". IMHO you're going to get Retrospect Tech Support to help you straighten this out on behalf of others as well as yourself. Here's why and how to do that. P.S.: You don't need Retrospect Tech Support to straighten this out, unless you're trying to install Mojave on "backup server" and/or "client" machines that have a version of Retrospect prior to Retrospect Mac 15.5. If you're already running Retrospect Mac 15.5 on all your Mojave-upgraded machines, all you need to do is follow the instructions in this September 21st Knowledge Base article—which I just discovered. Note that the article validates my "seekrit location" hypothesis.
  12. DavidHertzberg

    Full Access Mojave

    henry-in-florida, I'm just a laggard who is still running Sierra. However: On my MacBook Pro client, under Preference Panes, there is a file named Retrospect Client.prefPane. As far as Instant Scan for APFS on Mojave, read this post—as well as previous ones in that thread—and weep. P.S.: As far as Full Access is concerned, see if you can read this Web page for Backblaze installation in Mojave—which may be password-protected (I had to sign up, even though I don't intend to use Backblaze). If you can't read the page, the following is a paste—which may enable you to do the equivalent for the Retrospect application: [begin paste] Giving Backblaze Full Disk Access After Updating To Mojave 1. After updating to the latest client, open the Applications Folder. 2. Open the System Preferences on your Mac by clicking the apple icon in the upper-left corner and select System preferences. 3. Click Security & Privacy settings. 4. Select "Full Disk Access" in the left-hand column. 5. If necessary, click the lock and enter your Mac's username and password to allow you to make changes. 6. Drag the Backblaze app into the Full Disk Access location and release the Backblaze icon into it as show in the images below. 7. Restart your Mac. After reboot, once Backblaze does a hard drive scan it should back up everything that the Mojave upgrade excluded and your backup should remain safe! **Note: If you are still having issues with the Mac Menu Bar Backblaze icon please click here for instructions. Was this article helpful? 43 out of 56 found this helpful Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Have more questions? Submit a request 0 Comments Article is closed for comments. Related articles Backblaze Icon doesn't work after upgrading to Mojave Inherit Backup State Safety Freeze (Your Backup is Safety Frozen) Removing a Backup From an Account and Reassigning a License Backing up External Hard Drives [end paste]
  13. ShadeTek, When Retrospect does that, does it at least occasionally catch additional errors on the verify pass? I ask because IM long-ago E a significant percentage of read errors for tapes were caused by something happening to a tape surface after it had been recorded on. I should point out that my most recent ten years of tape experience was with DDS tape drives based on Digital Audio Tape technology. Although Retrospect verify passes reported these as quite reliable—unlike previous tape drives I had used, the fact that DAT technology was fundamentally designed by Sony as a not-too-much-more-expensive replacement for the analog audio compact cassette meant it did not have any frills such as readback-after-write ÅFAIK. I should also point out that my mainframe computer experience goes back to the mid-1960s, with 2400-foot half-inch-wide 7-track reel-to-reel tapes on drives that cost many tens-of-thousands of dollars. You don't want to hear about that; it would spoil your digestion.
  14. DavidHertzberg

    Subnet Broadcasting

    Nigel Smith, Your latest post has enabled me to realize that I had forgotten that there's more than one way to set up a static IP address. When I switched my apartment LAN from LocalTalk to Ethernet in 1998, I needed to re-enable my wife's Mac to print on my HP LaserJet 5MP printer—which is in a different room. That printer is so old (but so sturdy that it still works fine for my limited needs) that I had to buy an HP JetDirect EX Plus to interface between its parallel port and my Ethernet LAN. When I bought a MacBook Pro in 2015, a poster (who shortly thereafter turned out to be Retrospect-hating, BTW) on the Ars Technica Mac Forums suggested I give the EX Plus a static IP address via the router (as opposed to doing it by Telnetting into the EX Plus, which I had been doing). Then Andy—the now-departed Tech Support phone-answerer—told me shortly thereafter that I needed to give my client machines static IP addresses so that Retrospect Mac 12 could connect with them, so I did that via my router also. Over the intervening years, I had forgotten that you can also assign a computer itself a static IP address via System Preferences—>Network (or the equivalent on other OSes). Because giving computers static IP addresses on a network's router is done by equating an IPV4 address to the computer's MAC address, I couldn't understand how the Fortigate IPS would let you permanently assign two static IP addresses for a client—one on the 45 subnet and one on the 183 subnet. I now understand that that's not what you needed to do. Sorry.
  15. DavidHertzberg

    Copy Backup to tape extremely slow

    j.a.duke, What Nigel Smith says in his first paragraph is so eminently correct that another developer of client-server backup software years ago implemented a "multiplexed backup" capability that only works for tape destinations. But that's designed to speed up Backup scripts (whatever NB's terminology is), not Copy Backup scripts. My suggestion would be to turn off the following Options: Match Source Media Set to destination Media Set, Don't add duplicates to Media Set, Match only files in same location/path. The post in another thread you linked to justifies that. Why should you care if you copy a few extra backups to an offsite backup, if the overall time to complete that copying is improved? Another approach would be to reduce the time-after-Backup for the Copy Backup to complete, by implementing the overlapping approach described in the first paragraph of this post and the thread it links to (sorry, the Forums software no longer has the post-in-thread-numbering feature it used to have). However be very aware of the problem stated in the second paragraph of that same post.
  16. Lennart_T is, as usual, correct (second paragraph of the section).
  17. DavidHertzberg

    Subnet Broadcasting

    Nigel Smith, Thanks for the enhanced explanation. What I understand from it is that, to Add the Retrospect Client on a client machine client via subnet broadcast discovery , you must—presumably via Fortigate IPS—set it up with a static address on the 45 subnet. After you've done the Add, you must also set the client machine up with a static address on the 183 subnet. Obviously the static address you set up on the 183 subnet is not used when the client machine shows up on the 45 subnet; I guess this is due to the magic of Fortigate IPS. I'm as surprised as you are to learn that the Retrospect "backup server" recognizes an already-Added client no matter which subnet it is connected to; my undoubtedly-ignorant guess is that the recognition is by Computer Name (System Preferences—>Sharing on Macs). We'd probably all love to hear an explanation of why your organization won't let the "backup server" directly see the 183 subnet. Can you give a security-sanitized one? Does it have to do with different levels of trust?
  18. DavidHertzberg

    Subnet Broadcasting

    Nigel Smith, Hold on a friggin' minute, there. If your "[backup] server sits on the 45 subnet", how can it setup a a static client to a 183 address? And how can it then setup a a static client for the same machine to a 45 address? is the setting up of static clients done through the Fortigate IPS? You owe us a decent explanation of what I've quoted from your last post, and IMHO you can provide one without violating the secrets of your installation's security—or expecting us to be experts in the capabilities of networking hardware/software.. P.S.: Furthermore, does the setting of a client to a static address have to be done each time a client logs on to one subnet or the other, or just once for each client on each subnet? If it's the former, who does the setting—the Backup Administrator (i.e., you) or someone from IT? What does "three for three (so far)" mean, individual backups handled or clients permanently set up on both subnets?
  19. DavidHertzberg

    Can't access volume Error -1102

    The have been a number of Forums topics dealing with the -1102 error message, but most of them have been for Retrospect Windows. Here's one that was for Retrospect Mac 8. To find all such topics, type "-1102" with the surrounding quotes into the Search oval on the top right of this page, then click the question mark symbol. The cumulative Release Notes for Retrospect Mac 15 show there has never been a bug fix for this problem. My impression, from glancing at some of the topics found as per the preceding paragraph, is that people get this error after doing "funny things" with a disk.
  20. DavidHertzberg

    How fast are your network backups?

    If what Retrospect Tech Support has told insont as recounted in this post gets done on schedule, it looks as if Retrospect 16 will go a long way towards solving the speed-of-backups problem. The 21 March Knowledge Base article that post links to talks about adding an option "FileSystemApi=2" to /Library/Application Support/Retrospect/retro.ini; the name of that option sounds to me—a retired applications programmer—as if "the client scan APIs will be completely overhauled" in the post means more than just for Instant Scan. Now if Retrospect Mac 16 doesn't make the -530 bugs worse, which is what apparently happened with the Retrospect Mac 14.6 Client (explaining why I'm still running the Retrospect Mac 14.6 Engine and Console with the Retrospect Mac 14.1 Cient), I'll be resigned to backing up my secondary Digital Audio G4 (running OS X 10.3 ) separately with Retrospect Mac 6 onto DAT tape after I upgrade to Retrospect Mac 16 for my primary "backup server". I should report here that I have twice run test versions of Retrospect—and sent them log files—at Tech Support's request, but they haven't sent me a test version that actually fixes any of the -530 bugs in backing up my primary MacBook Pro.
  21. DavidHertzberg

    No more instant scan on MacOS?

    insont, That's good, because I just found a 15 May 2018 Knowledge Base article change confirming what you've been saying. The paragraph "Mac Customers: Please note that Instant Scan is not supported with APFS." has been added below the first paragraph in the KB article "Instant Scan Frequently Asked Questions". which is under the catch-all heading "Resources" in the KB . That first paragraph begins with the sentence "Retrospect 10 for Macintosh and Retrospect 8 for Windows introduced a new feature called Instant Scan." This section of the permalinked old version of the Wikipedia article says those versions were introduced in 2012, so the original article almost certainly dates from sometime shortly after that year up through April 2015—when the companion article "Instant Scan Advanced Options" was published. Sorry to have previously expressed doubt, Martin. Pretty sneaky announcement there, Retrospect Inc. ; you didn't even point Martin to it in your final reply to his Support Case.
  22. DavidHertzberg

    Subnet Broadcasting

    Nigel Smith, It appears that you have two intra-organizational foul-ups. One is that you have more non-static devices than addresses in the IP pool, which sounds to me like a merger foul-up—possibly compounded by the IPV4 address shortage and associated money problems. The other is that "the gateway 'upgrade' last year " means "server sits on the 45-subnet and can broadcast-detect all clients on that subnet but no clients on the 183", which sounds to me like some sort of security-motivated foul-up—since you say "each client can get either a 45- or 183-based DHCP provided address when they connect to our network". I don't expect you to explain those foul-ups on this forum, but I suspect switching to any client-server other than Retrospect will result in your organization's spending much more money and you spending much more time than would be palatable. One alternative is to simply set up a second Retrospect "backup server" on a machine that has full access to the 183-based subnet. Since you are willing to "maintain concurrent operations and allow different clients to use different backup sets", I suspect that Retrospect 16's full Retrospect Management Console—expected to be available in March 2019—will allow you to meet these needs by monitoring and controlling both "backup servers" from one Console. An extra "backup server" machine would be trivial for an organization of your size, and I'm sure you can negotiate with Retrospect Inc. for no additional license fee in a situation that could be viewed as being the fault of a deficiency in their product. Another alternative is Remote Backup, as I have mentioned above. This KB article says you have to use public/private keypairs for he facility. However, the top of page 60 in the Retrospect Mac 15 UG says "Distribute or copy this public_key folder containing the pubkey.dat file along with the Retrospect Client installer. As long as the public_key folder is located at the same level with the Client installer when the installer is run, the proper encryption keys (pubkey.dat, pubkey1.dat, pubkey2.dat, ..., pubkey9.dat) will be installed on each client". Unless the use of multiple encryption keys is a facility peculiar to the Mac Client, IMHO the lack of this same paragraph in the Retrospect Windows 15 UG is simply another example of the accumulated inconsistencies between the Mac and Windows UGs for which I have justifiably criticized (see the second sentence in the next paragraph) Retrospect Inc.. Either way I agree that you should discuss your problem with the head of Retrospect Technical Support. I am not mentioning his name, as you have done, because it is my impression that he does a daily search of the Forums for posts by me containing his name—resulting in his coming down on me like a ton of bricks for any thoroughly justified or joking criticism of Retrospect Inc. or its customers contained in them. Other than that, he has apparently been too busy for the past year or so—since he lost his assistant—to look at the Forums. That is why I suggested that you create a Support Case, because I suspect he will automatically refer any phone call from you—likely a Brit—to European Support. P.S.: If your Support Case does not receive prompt attention, I suggest that you phone Retrospect Sales—who have on one occasion "goosed" Tech Support for me. The head of Sales is Werner Walter; his U.S. phone number is (925) 476-1030 extension 814, his e-mail is Werner.Walter@Retrospect.com. If you have to do this, be sure to mention the specific other client-server backup application that you are considering switching to; the thought of a current customer—especially one who has just purchased the latest version as you have—having inquired about the competition tends to energize salespeople. Also please be aware that the "description of your issue" in the Support Case form is IME limited to about 2000 characters by the Support Case software. If you go over that limit your "description" will be broken up into a "description" plus one or more "additional notes". The same is true for any additional notes you may later post yourself. I suggest that, to avoid the appearance of choppiness in your Support Case, you create your case from your posts in this thread and then copy it paragraph-by-paragraph to your Support Case. Finally please be aware that the Support Case software does not support any text formatting; to underline something I suggest putting the underscore character in front of the first and behind the last word you would like to underline. P.P.S.: Removed mention of Storage Groups from 2nd paragraph; a Backup Set is supposed to be simultaneously updateable by more than one activity if it's a Storage Group, but no doubt the Backup Set itself (as opposed to its Members) must be defined on only one disk drive—which couldn't be simultaneously updated by activities running on two different "backup servers".
  23. DavidHertzberg

    Subnet Broadcasting

    Nigel Smith, Thinking further, it occurred to me that "each client can get either a 45- or 183-based DHCP provided address when they connect to our network" means the clients on those two subnets transiently connect to your network. That sounds to me as if you are likely to be using Proactive scripts to back them up. If so, it seems that Retrospect 15.1 might be able to handle those clients with its new Remote Backup feature. That, to the extent I understand it, would mean that each client machine would have to have an IP address on whichever subnet it connects to. You might have to set these up (I don't know how with Fortigate involved) with two static IPs for each client machine's MAC address, one for each subnet it might connect to. Your "backup server" would have to have port 497 open—and port 22024 if you want to allow on-demand requests, and would have to have the "Remote Backup Clients" item defined on Volumes and the "Remote Backup Clients" tag defined under Sources; it would also have to be set up with a public/private keypair per "Installing Windows Clients for Multiple Log In" starting on page 275 of the Retrospect Windows 15 User's Guide. You would then have to give each installed client the public key, apparently according to this post. Thus a particular client machine would get Proactively backed up on whichever subnet it connected to. P.S.: Revised second paragraph, because my first version would have required duplicate Proactive scripts using different names for the same client (because it would be set up with two static IPs for the client machine's MAC address, one for each subnet) depending on which subnet it was connected to—which I'm sure you would consider undesirable. Basically I'm pretty sure (but you should ask Retrospect T. S.) that a Client doesn't even respond to Layer 2 broadcast traffic; it requires Layer 3 (my only exposure to networking layers was in one lecture of a course I took in 1990; I'm a retired applications programmer). I suspect your topology involves client computers that move around between connections, which would have been unusual in 1990 because Wi-Fi didn't yet exist. Public/private keypairs were invented for situations where Natasha Fatale might be able to spoof the IP address and password of enterprise-employee Carmen Sandiego's computer; it was Retrospect Inc.'s recent insight that Carmen might be connecting from another network anywhere in the world and would need the Remote Backup facility. In that case Carmen wouldn't need to have an IP address assigned, which is why I changed to "might" in the third sentence of the second paragraph.
  24. DavidHertzberg

    Subnet Broadcasting

    Nigel Smith, As I've said elsewhere, I run Retrospect Mac 14 on a small home network with no subnetting. IIRC, when I Add a Removed and re-installed Client from my "backup server", the Client software stores the server address of the "backup server" that Added it—which cannot then be changed (I just checked in a System Preferences—>Retrospect). If you install a bunch of clients from the 192.168.183.15 "backup server" address , it sounds to me as if those clients will communicate over the .address ff.ff.ff.ff.ff.ff (is that an IPV6 address?—it's 48 instead of 64 bits) because that's how your Fortigate is set up. If that doesn't work I will fearlessly offer some suggestions, probably based on a misunderstanding of your problem and certainly with no knowledge of the Fortigate IPS. First, have you considered establishing a fixed IP address for each client machine, based on its MAC address (upper-case "MAC" stands for "media access control", and has nothing to do with "Mac" as an abbreviation for Macintosh—though many people think it does)? I was advised by the now-departed assistant to the head of Retrospect Technical Support to do this through my router when I installed Retrospect Mac 12 in 2015; it had not been necessary through Retrospect Mac 6. I don't know how you would do this in conjunction with Fortigate. You would then Remove, re-install, and re-Add each Client on your "backup server"—specifying that fixed IP address. Second, have you considered "Using Public/Private Key Authentication with Retrospect Clients", which is described starting on page 59 of the Retrospect Mac 15 User's Guide (you can find the equivalent section in the Retrospect Windows 15 UG; I'm not going to bother)? Third, you should try using the technique described in this Knowledge Base article. If testing with the ip command works, you would obviously want to switch to using the ipsave command. Fourth, you may still be entitled to free Tech Support because you have purchased Retrospect 15. Based on the experience of another administrator, it seems that Retrospect Inc.'s European TS is contracted out to people who are not very knowledgeable. I would instead submit a Support Request to Walnut Creek CA via this form. P.S.: Added new first paragraph.
  25. DavidHertzberg

    Subnet Broadcasting

    Nigel Smith, Your post doesn't say what version of Retrospect you are using, and whether it is Retrospect Windows or Retrospect Mac. Rather than waste my time by making an inquiry, I'll just assume it is some version of Retrospect Mac—as most of your past posts seem to indicate. Everything I know about setting subnet addresses in Retrospect, which isn't much, is contained in the posts I made in this thread last year. I suggest you read all those post, and view the video by the head of Retrospect Tech Support I linked to in one of them. I also suggest you read this section of the relevant Wikipedia article. I don't know anything about setting server interfaces, so someone else will have to comment on that.
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