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  1. 3 points
    This document (as of July 31 2018, Retrospect Desktop 15.1.2.100) is intended to augment the information in the official Retrospect 15 User Guide. All errors are my responsibility. I do not guarantee that this applies to any other version of Retrospect; in fact, I don't guarantee anything about this at all! ? YMMV. Buyer Beware. Etc. A few items highlighted below are not certain for me at this time. Insight welcome! Preparing for Disaster A. Crucial Attributes To Record About Each Client/Host System Several crucial attributes must be recorded about any client or host system that you wish to later restore with a DRD (Disaster Recovery Disk): 1) Disk Layout Why: the DRD is currently unable to fully auto-create this info. It's up to you to do so. Get it wrong and Things Can Go Badly Partition Table Type (MBR or GPT) Number and sequence of partitions. (MOST important: is there a "System Reserved" partition, is there a WinRE (Recovery) partition, which partition is Active, and what's the sequence?) (Nice to have: the name of the 'C:' windows partition) 2) Boot method Why: The boot method for recovery must match that of the system that was backed up. The DRD is currently not aware of this when regenerating a system. BIOS or UEFI? (MBR partition tables support both BIOS and UEFI boot. GPT partition tables only support UEFI boot, with a few rare exceptions.) Where is the boot BCD info? (From experience: Retrospect will NOT complain if your boot info is not on the C partition... and it may not be backed up!) For BIOS boot, the BCD info is typically either c:\boot\BCD or on the system reserved partition, at \boot\BCD. For UEFI boot, it's typically in one of those partitions, at \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\BCD or \EFI\boot\BCD. Hint: It's a good idea to save an exported copy of the BCD store while the system is in good shape. From Admin Cmd prompt: bcdedit /export c:\bcd-yymmdd will save it. [7/31/18 update] There is some indication that UEFI but not BIOS boot information is backed up from any appropriate partition. We're in discussion on this. If you have a complex multi-boot (eg using GRUB or even manually-added BCD entries), I would suggest keeping an image of your boot disk. Retrospect uses Microsoft Windows tools for recovery; recovering non-Windows boot information is (quite reasonably) beyond the product's scope. 3) 64 bit drivers required Why: Many environments do not require 64 bit drivers. Some do. If so, you'll need a 64 bit DRD rather than the default 32 bit. I have one: unless extreme measures are taken (see below), access to our Catalog Files is on a RAID 1 internal drive pair, managed by IRST (Intel RAID Storage Tech) which uses 64 bit drivers on 64 bit Windows. 4) Custom drivers required Why: If recovery requires access to devices that need nonstandard drivers, you'll need to prepare ahead. Example: my IRST setup. Typically, custom disk drivers that can be used at boot time are downloadable either in normal "installable" form, or in what is known as "F6 Floppy" form (refers to pre-boot interruptable driver-load... TMI ) The DRD creation instructions tell you to copy these drivers to a particular place on your Retrospect Desktop machine before creating the DRD. Do it. (currently they go in <Retrospect Install Folder>/drsupp/drivers ) 5) Non-hard-drive boot methods fully supported for system recovery Why: Not all machines support USB memory key boot. Windows 7 does not fully support USB for recovery operations. You may need a DVD (even a USB DVD, strangely). B. Crucial Things to Know About the Disaster Recovery Disk This information is not documented elsewhere, AFAIK, other than the first line below 1) The DRD... Why: These attributes determine how many DRD's you may want to create and maintain. AND, you'll want to update the DRD after significant system or Retrospect config changes. Is either 32 or 64 bit, and recovers a certain range of OS versions (eg seven varieties of Win10, etc) Assumes the boot style of the host system (it appears the DRD is intended to boot both UEFI and BIOS. Not yet clear if this works properly. For now I would not make assumptions.) Contains all Retrospect configuration as of when it is created, including Devices, Clients, Backup Sets, Volumes, Selectors, Preferences, Licenses, and Automation Settings Has built-in drivers for network, USB and many other devices Why: These attributes are unknown to the DRD. You'll need to maintain this knowledge separately, available for use in case of disaster Does not know how to auto-restore system Partition Table types (Reserved, Recovery, etc), partition settings, have access to catalog files on other disks, or login info to access network shares 2) Where do you keep your Catalog File? Why: Be sure you can get to the catalog file while recovering from a disaster! It's easy to move the catalog file off of your boot drive. Do it. (Or, make a copy as part of your backup strategy) In our case, to avoid other hassles, we host DRD recovery using a copy of the catalog files loaded into a USB stick. Easy-peasy. C. Before Creating the DRD Do you need custom drivers? Make sure they are in place already (see above)! For Windows 10, you need to download and install the ADK as described in the DRD documentation. These items are not yet documented: For Windows 7, a different kit is needed, the "AIK" You don't need to install the whole kit. When running the ADK setup, uncheck everything other than "Windows Preinstallation Environment (Windows PE)"... which will auto-check "Deployment Tools" Highly recommended: just before you create the DRD, do something to disable or pause all auto-run scripts! The DRD recovery environment is a "real" Retrospect environment, and will attempt to run any active scripts! (I introduced an N month delay in all scripts as a workaround, then removed it) Yes, it is possible to cancel all scripts once the DRD is running, but that can take quite a while as Retrospect goes through "preparing for open file backup" on the active scripts...) D. Creating the DRD The DRD tool wants you to locate a file, "copype.cmd" . The Retrospect team intends to auto-find this, but that's not yet implemented. The file is found in <Kit install dir>/Assessment and Deployment Kit/Windows Preinstallation Environment Bare Metal Recovery A. Preparing the System Ensure the system is set up in a similar fashion to the original system that will be restored. In particular: Boot settings so the system boots into the correct boot type (UEFI vs Legacy/BIOS. For one of our machines that supports both, I had to force it to Legacy to get everything working.) The correct Partition Table Type and Partition Layout (The DRD can create partitions, but has no ability to set Partition Types, special partition formats, detail-level partition sizes, etc.) (At first I reloaded Win10 on a system to be reloaded. The partitions were laid out very differently, and in particular a different count and sequence. Result: the recovery process wanted to wipe the contents of other data drives on the machine! Another time, the recovery immediately failed with strange VSS errors. Only when I correctly pre-set all of these elements did recovery go reasonably well. Tech Support has informed me these are known bugs (eg Bug 6109 about an invalid disk erasure warning)... however, if you have any concern for preserving drives, I urge care in restoring to ensure you don't accidentally make things worse than they already are ) B. Doing the Restore The recovery process involves several steps. Remember, I'm just giving additional notes and hints. The primary steps involve: pre-setup, run retrospect, post-restore Pre-setup: if you've predefined the partitions, you'll mostly just want to erase and reformat the 'C:' windows partition. Give it the same name that it had before to make life simple. Pre-setup: If you'll need network access to your backup sets, this is a good time to do a network-use of any needed shares. The DRD process will remember you're logged in from this point on Pre-setup: if you have other disks (eg USB stick) to attach to the system, eg containing Catalog files, now's the time to plug them in. In retrospect: check the needed catalog file(s) / backup sets. Can they be accessed (double click in 'Backup Sets'). If not, click "More..." then "Open..." to open the catalog file. Drag-and-drop of a catalog file does not work at this point to attach it. In retrospect: to do the recovery, go through the "Restore" process. I find it helpful to click on "Switch to Advanced Mode", and go through the steps one by one to be sure everything is as desired. In retrospect: before rebooting, be sure to remove the DRD disk! You don't want to just run the recovery again Post-restore: (if using Dissimilar Hardware Restore, don't leave the DRD script after finishing with Retrospect!) C. After Restore When my main host restore was complete, after reboot I got "no operating system found"... a bit scary. Solution for my situation: Boot with a Windows Recovery CD, get to a command prompt, and use these commands... bcdedit (shows boot information setup, if any. My system had none! bcdedit /store x:\boot\BCD is good to know about...) bootrec /rebuildbcd (finds windows and builds the correct boot environment) bcdboot c:\Windows /s b: /f BIOS /v [where the drive letters are what's valid in your recovery environment; "c:" is your windows volume, and "b:" is your boot volume, which could be the same as the windows volume, or could be the System Reserved partition.) ALSO of note: for bcdboot to work, you need a valid copy of the following file from the bootable normal windows environment: c:\windows\system32\config\BCD-Template If you get further errors, you're beyond the scope of this hints-doc. Lots of material is out there to assist you. All is NOT lost. Building A DRD After The Fact I didn't have a chance to build a DRD before the boot disk on our primary backup system died. Here's what worked to get around that not-so-little problem: Downloaded a Windows 10 Pro installer from Microsoft (yes, it's free... controlled by license codes and activation keys) Used a separate tool set to predefine the partition structure of the replacement drive, to match the old one. MBR disk with System, C:, WinRE in my case. Didn't put any data in the partitions. Installed Win10 Pro into the C partition. Told it "no license key" since it was already activated. It really did auto-activate when the time came. Downloaded and installed Retrospect. used the c:\ProgramData\Retrospect\Config77.dat file from my almost-totally-dead drive. This gave me a very nice working environment Installed the ADK as described above Modified a few Retrospect scripts as described above Installed the IRST drivers. Then (due to other problems I'll not discuss here) switched tactics and recovered the current catalog files from my RAID to a USB key With the USB key catalogs in place, and all other drives disconnected, created the DRD Bottom Line This all sounds so neat and tidy... I have done this writeup because my actual recovery process involved discovering the hard way that there are many undocumented aspects to the DRD process! I suspect with these notes, a Retrospect Desktop system could be easily recovered in a matter of hours. Mine... well let's just say I began recovery Sunday evening and finished Wednesday morning... (One of those times when I wish I could get paid by vendors who benefit from my bug-sleuthing skills?
  2. 2 points
    Wha is an "august Documentation Committee"? Sounds like fake news, if you ask me.
  3. 2 points
    The QNAP NAS is a new Source to Retrospect which it has never seen before so will try to do a backup of all the files it finds there regardless of whether you think Retrospect has seen them before. The reasons are covered in more detail elsewhere on the forum but in short, without doing a byte-by-byte comparison of the files which Retrospect does not do, Retrospect has no way of knowing if a file now on QNAP is the exact same file that was on the Synology. Once the first full backup of the QNAP NAS is complete normal operations should resume.
  4. 2 points
    Excited to report that I got my Retrospect backups fixed now as well !! So, disabling the "Save space and download files as you use them" setting did not work for me. So in addition to that, I tried disabling OneDrive altogether (Unlink PC/account and then remove the entire OneDrive folder) and then linking my account again which then again downloaded all files. The next Retrospect scheduled (proactive actually) run then succeeded with 0 errors or warnings ! This worked now on 2 machines already, so will try kids laptop next, but pretty confident this will work as well. Thanks to the folks active in this thread !
  5. 2 points
    Ok, I did some additional debugging and I found the issue: It's OneDrive. OneDrive has an option (don't know if it's new with 1803) that gives you the possibility to only actually download a file from OneDrive to your computer if you actually use it. All files in the OneDrive folder are shown as being present, but they are not actually physically present on your computer. So they are some sort of link. The explorer shows a cloud symbol with these files. As long as one such link is present on the drive (even if it is in the Recycle bin) it will cause the -1103 error. Scanning will be interrupted as soon as the scan engine hits the OneDrive folder. On both machines I turned the option off in OneDrive settings, which caused all OneDrive files to be downloaded to the computer, and both are backing up properly now, without errors. Also checked the machines that never showed the issue, they all have this OneDrive option set to off.
  6. 2 points
    Oh well, #sigh I have a few Macs. All on WIFi All on DHCP They have to be this way, because they roam from office-to-office, client-to-client, home-to-work-to-home ... like laptops do. The error -530 and associated -519 has be around in almost every version of retrospect I have used for the past 20 years. I can never find the solution, apart from a full client reinstall, and I can not be doing that every week TBH! Is there ever going to be a stable answer? Each Mac, Client and Server has no firewall or anti-virus FYI. The fixed desktop Laptops that do not leave the office have no issues. The laptops returning to the office login automatically to the WIFI and have no network issues for everyday work; email, www, ftp, server shares, printing ... what so ever. Server: Mac OSX 10.11.6 Client: OSX 10.12.6 Retrospect 13.5 Please don't say 'upgrade to the latest version of Retrospect or I may have to slap you :-) That has never been an answer to this issue.
  7. 1 point
    This is a pretty serious regression since the 12.x versions. Certain errors (specifically including a client being unreachable) no longer fail elegantly with an emailed report, but cause the whole engine to hang so that nothing is backed up. Further more, the hang is serious enough that it can't be restarted from the dashboard - it requires the task manager with elevated permissions.
  8. 1 point
    This might help: https://www.retrospect.com/en/support/kb/scanning_incomplete_1103
  9. 1 point
    Hi, It would be real time saver if we would be able select multiple snaphots to forget in a disk based backup set. As it stands now you can only select one at a time, shift or control click doesn't work. Thanks, Johnny Mac
  10. 1 point
    AFAIK you don't necessarily need separate client vs server DRD's. I'm working to get clarification on some of these things from the tech support team. They are definitely aware of the confusing documentation etc.
  11. 1 point
    In Windows 10 Home, I unlinked the account, turned off OneDrive and in Add / Remove programs, uninstalled it. That allowed me to then delete the OneDrive directories. True, the OneDrive folders returned later as visible in Windows Explorer ... but the issue with the directory is gone. Wonders never cease.
  12. 1 point
    I am running Retrospect 15 and I'm having similar problems backing up a Windows 10 (Build 1803) laptop as a client. The client has 2 drives: C: (the OS) and Z: (a recovery partition). There are no issues backing up the host, which is a Windows 10 (Build 1803) desktop computer. No issues backing up 2 other clients that are Windows 7 computers. The first backup of the client laptop was working. It passed through the scan and was backing up files. However, I had to stop the backup midway for unrelated reasons. The next 2 attempts at a backup made it successfully through the scan for drive C: and some files were backed up. However, the -1103 error was thrown for the C: drive and the backup aborted. No issues at all backing up the Z: drive. All subsequent attempts for open file backup on the client resulted in the C: drive failing during the scan and no problems with the Z: drive. I confirmed VSS errors in the event log on the client at the same time as the -1103 errors. I can do a backup with "open files" disabled, although there are several warnings for sharing violations, which I assume would be expected. I have submitted a support ticket.
  13. 1 point
    In short an Archive script is a Backup script but with the additional option to delete the copied files from the Source once they have been copied to the Destination and verified.
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