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  1. 3 points
    David, your condescending comments aren't needed here. Martin (and others, myself included) are frustrated at this slowness, and a little venting is not out of order. I don't understand why you feel the need to carry water for Dantz - if you don't have anything positive to contribute, you aren't required to post.
  2. 3 points
    This document (as of July 31 2018, Retrospect Desktop 15.1.2.100) is intended to augment the information in the official Retrospect 15 User Guide. All errors are my responsibility. I do not guarantee that this applies to any other version of Retrospect; in fact, I don't guarantee anything about this at all! ? YMMV. Buyer Beware. Etc. A few items highlighted below are not certain for me at this time. Insight welcome! Preparing for Disaster A. Crucial Attributes To Record About Each Client/Host System Several crucial attributes must be recorded about any client or host system that you wish to later restore with a DRD (Disaster Recovery Disk): 1) Disk Layout Why: the DRD is currently unable to fully auto-create this info. It's up to you to do so. Get it wrong and Things Can Go Badly Partition Table Type (MBR or GPT) Number and sequence of partitions. (MOST important: is there a "System Reserved" partition, is there a WinRE (Recovery) partition, which partition is Active, and what's the sequence?) (Nice to have: the name of the 'C:' windows partition) 2) Boot method Why: The boot method for recovery must match that of the system that was backed up. The DRD is currently not aware of this when regenerating a system. BIOS or UEFI? (MBR partition tables support both BIOS and UEFI boot. GPT partition tables only support UEFI boot, with a few rare exceptions.) Where is the boot BCD info? (From experience: Retrospect will NOT complain if your boot info is not on the C partition... and it may not be backed up!) For BIOS boot, the BCD info is typically either c:\boot\BCD or on the system reserved partition, at \boot\BCD. For UEFI boot, it's typically in one of those partitions, at \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\BCD or \EFI\boot\BCD. Hint: It's a good idea to save an exported copy of the BCD store while the system is in good shape. From Admin Cmd prompt: bcdedit /export c:\bcd-yymmdd will save it. [7/31/18 update] There is some indication that UEFI but not BIOS boot information is backed up from any appropriate partition. We're in discussion on this. If you have a complex multi-boot (eg using GRUB or even manually-added BCD entries), I would suggest keeping an image of your boot disk. Retrospect uses Microsoft Windows tools for recovery; recovering non-Windows boot information is (quite reasonably) beyond the product's scope. 3) 64 bit drivers required Why: Many environments do not require 64 bit drivers. Some do. If so, you'll need a 64 bit DRD rather than the default 32 bit. I have one: unless extreme measures are taken (see below), access to our Catalog Files is on a RAID 1 internal drive pair, managed by IRST (Intel RAID Storage Tech) which uses 64 bit drivers on 64 bit Windows. 4) Custom drivers required Why: If recovery requires access to devices that need nonstandard drivers, you'll need to prepare ahead. Example: my IRST setup. Typically, custom disk drivers that can be used at boot time are downloadable either in normal "installable" form, or in what is known as "F6 Floppy" form (refers to pre-boot interruptable driver-load... TMI ) The DRD creation instructions tell you to copy these drivers to a particular place on your Retrospect Desktop machine before creating the DRD. Do it. (currently they go in <Retrospect Install Folder>/drsupp/drivers ) 5) Non-hard-drive boot methods fully supported for system recovery Why: Not all machines support USB memory key boot. Windows 7 does not fully support USB for recovery operations. You may need a DVD (even a USB DVD, strangely). B. Crucial Things to Know About the Disaster Recovery Disk This information is not documented elsewhere, AFAIK, other than the first line below 1) The DRD... Why: These attributes determine how many DRD's you may want to create and maintain. AND, you'll want to update the DRD after significant system or Retrospect config changes. Is either 32 or 64 bit, and recovers a certain range of OS versions (eg seven varieties of Win10, etc) Assumes the boot style of the host system (it appears the DRD is intended to boot both UEFI and BIOS. Not yet clear if this works properly. For now I would not make assumptions.) Contains all Retrospect configuration as of when it is created, including Devices, Clients, Backup Sets, Volumes, Selectors, Preferences, Licenses, and Automation Settings Has built-in drivers for network, USB and many other devices Why: These attributes are unknown to the DRD. You'll need to maintain this knowledge separately, available for use in case of disaster Does not know how to auto-restore system Partition Table types (Reserved, Recovery, etc), partition settings, have access to catalog files on other disks, or login info to access network shares 2) Where do you keep your Catalog File? Why: Be sure you can get to the catalog file while recovering from a disaster! It's easy to move the catalog file off of your boot drive. Do it. (Or, make a copy as part of your backup strategy) In our case, to avoid other hassles, we host DRD recovery using a copy of the catalog files loaded into a USB stick. Easy-peasy. C. Before Creating the DRD Do you need custom drivers? Make sure they are in place already (see above)! For Windows 10, you need to download and install the ADK as described in the DRD documentation. These items are not yet documented: For Windows 7, a different kit is needed, the "AIK" You don't need to install the whole kit. When running the ADK setup, uncheck everything other than "Windows Preinstallation Environment (Windows PE)"... which will auto-check "Deployment Tools" Highly recommended: just before you create the DRD, do something to disable or pause all auto-run scripts! The DRD recovery environment is a "real" Retrospect environment, and will attempt to run any active scripts! (I introduced an N month delay in all scripts as a workaround, then removed it) Yes, it is possible to cancel all scripts once the DRD is running, but that can take quite a while as Retrospect goes through "preparing for open file backup" on the active scripts...) D. Creating the DRD The DRD tool wants you to locate a file, "copype.cmd" . The Retrospect team intends to auto-find this, but that's not yet implemented. The file is found in <Kit install dir>/Assessment and Deployment Kit/Windows Preinstallation Environment Bare Metal Recovery A. Preparing the System Ensure the system is set up in a similar fashion to the original system that will be restored. In particular: Boot settings so the system boots into the correct boot type (UEFI vs Legacy/BIOS. For one of our machines that supports both, I had to force it to Legacy to get everything working.) The correct Partition Table Type and Partition Layout (The DRD can create partitions, but has no ability to set Partition Types, special partition formats, detail-level partition sizes, etc.) (At first I reloaded Win10 on a system to be reloaded. The partitions were laid out very differently, and in particular a different count and sequence. Result: the recovery process wanted to wipe the contents of other data drives on the machine! Another time, the recovery immediately failed with strange VSS errors. Only when I correctly pre-set all of these elements did recovery go reasonably well. Tech Support has informed me these are known bugs (eg Bug 6109 about an invalid disk erasure warning)... however, if you have any concern for preserving drives, I urge care in restoring to ensure you don't accidentally make things worse than they already are ) B. Doing the Restore The recovery process involves several steps. Remember, I'm just giving additional notes and hints. The primary steps involve: pre-setup, run retrospect, post-restore Pre-setup: if you've predefined the partitions, you'll mostly just want to erase and reformat the 'C:' windows partition. Give it the same name that it had before to make life simple. Pre-setup: If you'll need network access to your backup sets, this is a good time to do a network-use of any needed shares. The DRD process will remember you're logged in from this point on Pre-setup: if you have other disks (eg USB stick) to attach to the system, eg containing Catalog files, now's the time to plug them in. In retrospect: check the needed catalog file(s) / backup sets. Can they be accessed (double click in 'Backup Sets'). If not, click "More..." then "Open..." to open the catalog file. Drag-and-drop of a catalog file does not work at this point to attach it. In retrospect: to do the recovery, go through the "Restore" process. I find it helpful to click on "Switch to Advanced Mode", and go through the steps one by one to be sure everything is as desired. In retrospect: before rebooting, be sure to remove the DRD disk! You don't want to just run the recovery again Post-restore: (if using Dissimilar Hardware Restore, don't leave the DRD script after finishing with Retrospect!) C. After Restore When my main host restore was complete, after reboot I got "no operating system found"... a bit scary. Solution for my situation: Boot with a Windows Recovery CD, get to a command prompt, and use these commands... bcdedit (shows boot information setup, if any. My system had none! bcdedit /store x:\boot\BCD is good to know about...) bootrec /rebuildbcd (finds windows and builds the correct boot environment) bcdboot c:\Windows /s b: /f BIOS /v [where the drive letters are what's valid in your recovery environment; "c:" is your windows volume, and "b:" is your boot volume, which could be the same as the windows volume, or could be the System Reserved partition.) ALSO of note: for bcdboot to work, you need a valid copy of the following file from the bootable normal windows environment: c:\windows\system32\config\BCD-Template If you get further errors, you're beyond the scope of this hints-doc. Lots of material is out there to assist you. All is NOT lost. Building A DRD After The Fact I didn't have a chance to build a DRD before the boot disk on our primary backup system died. Here's what worked to get around that not-so-little problem: Downloaded a Windows 10 Pro installer from Microsoft (yes, it's free... controlled by license codes and activation keys) Used a separate tool set to predefine the partition structure of the replacement drive, to match the old one. MBR disk with System, C:, WinRE in my case. Didn't put any data in the partitions. Installed Win10 Pro into the C partition. Told it "no license key" since it was already activated. It really did auto-activate when the time came. Downloaded and installed Retrospect. used the c:\ProgramData\Retrospect\Config77.dat file from my almost-totally-dead drive. This gave me a very nice working environment Installed the ADK as described above Modified a few Retrospect scripts as described above Installed the IRST drivers. Then (due to other problems I'll not discuss here) switched tactics and recovered the current catalog files from my RAID to a USB key With the USB key catalogs in place, and all other drives disconnected, created the DRD Bottom Line This all sounds so neat and tidy... I have done this writeup because my actual recovery process involved discovering the hard way that there are many undocumented aspects to the DRD process! I suspect with these notes, a Retrospect Desktop system could be easily recovered in a matter of hours. Mine... well let's just say I began recovery Sunday evening and finished Wednesday morning... (One of those times when I wish I could get paid by vendors who benefit from my bug-sleuthing skills?
  3. 2 points
    As promised. The Test Client: "NIG-PC" -- Windows 10 VM, Retrospect 15.6.0, with C drive and external E drive. Both drives had "Test_Data" and "Test_Data2" directories, each with a couple of text files inside. Server: Windows Server 2016, Retrospect Multi Server Premium v15.6.1.104 Client was added by Direct IP with "Volumes" tab "Client Sources" set to "Client Desktop" -- both C and E drives were visible A new disk-based Backup Set called "Filter_Test" was created A new filter called "Filter_Test" was created, initially blank and then edited as per the following screenshots After the filter was edited, an Immediate Backup was created: Source -- "NIG-PC"; Destination -- "Filter_Test"; Selecting -- "Filter_Test". The Preview button was clicked and, once the results generated, the screenshot taken. The Immediate Backup was then cancelled to clear any cached Preview and to force a re-scan for the next test The Results "Windows folder path exactly matches \Test_Data\" -- no drive letter, so nothing is matched: "Windows folder path exactly matches E:\Test_Data" -- no trailing backslash, so nothing is matched: "Windows folder path exactly matches E:\Test_Data\" -- drive letter and trailing slash included, matches only with "Test_Data" on E and not E:\Test_Data2 or C:\Test_Data: So, what about "matches pattern"? We know from the filter dialog tip that "* matches any or no characters and ? matches any single character", but x509 had no special characters in his filter yet still got matches. Let's see what we can find out, starting with a filter similar to x509's... "Windows folder path matches pattern \Test_Data" -- matches Test_Data and Test_Data2 on both drives: "Windows folder path matches pattern \Test_Data\" -- matches Test_Data only on both drives: "Windows folder path matches pattern E:\Test" -- matches Test_Data and Test_Data2 only on the E drive: "Windows folder path matches pattern st_Data" -- matches Test_Data and Test_Data2 on both drives: Conclusion Exact folder matching requires a full path, including the drive letter, and a terminating backslash, i.e. "E:\Test_Data\". The "matches pattern" condition includes invisible "*"s, both prefix and postfix, i.e. if you enter "st_Data" it is actually "*st_Data*". That may be what you want, e.g. the same folder name at different levels of the directory structure across multiple drives on a client, but could also greatly widen the matches beyond what was expected. As always, the more explicit you are the closer the filter results will match your wishes. Vagueness on "includes" can massively increase backup resource requirements, vagueness on "excludes" can result in important data being missed. So test, test, test -- and be careful out there! Note Yes this was all done with "includes" whilst x509 was having trouble with "excludes" -- that's simply because I think it is much easier to see none, one or two ticked boxes amongst a column of unticked in a fuzzy screenshot than to spot the gaps in a line of selected items. But the conclusions above also apply to "excludes", and it's simple enough to verify for yourself if you doubt it. Hope that helps someone!
  4. 2 points
    Wha is an "august Documentation Committee"? Sounds like fake news, if you ask me.
  5. 2 points
    The QNAP NAS is a new Source to Retrospect which it has never seen before so will try to do a backup of all the files it finds there regardless of whether you think Retrospect has seen them before. The reasons are covered in more detail elsewhere on the forum but in short, without doing a byte-by-byte comparison of the files which Retrospect does not do, Retrospect has no way of knowing if a file now on QNAP is the exact same file that was on the Synology. Once the first full backup of the QNAP NAS is complete normal operations should resume.
  6. 2 points
    Excited to report that I got my Retrospect backups fixed now as well !! So, disabling the "Save space and download files as you use them" setting did not work for me. So in addition to that, I tried disabling OneDrive altogether (Unlink PC/account and then remove the entire OneDrive folder) and then linking my account again which then again downloaded all files. The next Retrospect scheduled (proactive actually) run then succeeded with 0 errors or warnings ! This worked now on 2 machines already, so will try kids laptop next, but pretty confident this will work as well. Thanks to the folks active in this thread !
  7. 2 points
    Ok, I did some additional debugging and I found the issue: It's OneDrive. OneDrive has an option (don't know if it's new with 1803) that gives you the possibility to only actually download a file from OneDrive to your computer if you actually use it. All files in the OneDrive folder are shown as being present, but they are not actually physically present on your computer. So they are some sort of link. The explorer shows a cloud symbol with these files. As long as one such link is present on the drive (even if it is in the Recycle bin) it will cause the -1103 error. Scanning will be interrupted as soon as the scan engine hits the OneDrive folder. On both machines I turned the option off in OneDrive settings, which caused all OneDrive files to be downloaded to the computer, and both are backing up properly now, without errors. Also checked the machines that never showed the issue, they all have this OneDrive option set to off.
  8. 2 points
    Oh well, #sigh I have a few Macs. All on WIFi All on DHCP They have to be this way, because they roam from office-to-office, client-to-client, home-to-work-to-home ... like laptops do. The error -530 and associated -519 has be around in almost every version of retrospect I have used for the past 20 years. I can never find the solution, apart from a full client reinstall, and I can not be doing that every week TBH! Is there ever going to be a stable answer? Each Mac, Client and Server has no firewall or anti-virus FYI. The fixed desktop Laptops that do not leave the office have no issues. The laptops returning to the office login automatically to the WIFI and have no network issues for everyday work; email, www, ftp, server shares, printing ... what so ever. Server: Mac OSX 10.11.6 Client: OSX 10.12.6 Retrospect 13.5 Please don't say 'upgrade to the latest version of Retrospect or I may have to slap you :-) That has never been an answer to this issue.
  9. 1 point
    Hi, It would be real time saver if we would be able select multiple snaphots to forget in a disk based backup set. As it stands now you can only select one at a time, shift or control click doesn't work. Thanks, Johnny Mac
  10. 1 point
    Interesting. I just finished discovering a specific set of bugs in Retrospect, and challenges in our router(s) and local network apps, that directly lead to the above anomalies in finding and/or connecting to clients. (Yes, all of the following has been submitted as a bug report.) I'm running a more Windows-centric network, with a little OSx tossed in, so my tools are a bit different. Tools: WireShark: shows packets actually traveling. Most useful is a filter of udp.port==497 || tcp.port==497 tcpdump (command line in linux and/or osx) - monitoring port 497 TCPview (from SysInternals, now owned by Microsoft) - sort on port. Look at what is listening to 497 and on what IP address(es) (command line) ipconfig and also "route print" In Retrospect: go into Clients -> choose a client-> access tab -> Interface -> Configure Interfaces ... and see what default interface IP address is. Things to watch for: Are UDP broadcast packets being received by clients? (eg 192.168.x.255, port 497) For multicast, are packets getting to clients? (eg 224.0.0.0/4 -- Retrospect uses 224.1.0.38 UDP port 497) Are clients responding to those packets (UDP broadcast or multicast) (initially to UDP port 497 on the backup system) If crossing subnets, is TTL set high enough to reach the client? What could possibly go wrong? Heh. Here are anomalies I've seen: Often, some app will create virtual interfaces. This includes npcap (for Wireshark etc), VMware, TAP-Windows (comes with Windows?), etc... This has led to: On some of my clients, some virtual interfaces have APIPA addresses (169.254.*) -- which makes it obvious when retrospect chooses the wrong interface to listen on! (Workaround: I uninstalled the TAP-Windows adapter as I don't need it. And I temporarily disabled npcap on the one workstation where that got in the way.) On my retrospect backup desktop, retrospect chose one of the VMware virtual adapters as the default adapter! This even though the real gig adapter has higher priority etc etc. (Workaround: create another adapter in Retrospect) The result in either case: I can't see the clients, even though ping works. I have a network security system. It regularly scans all ports on all subnets. Some (but not all) clients get confused by this, with the retroclient app hung up on an IP connection in CLOSE_WAIT status. The result: the client is never available for backups. Yet it is visible to subnet or multicast. We switched to a pfSense firewall/router. I just discovered that multicast forwarding is badly broken.(Workaround: manually installed pimd.) Similarly, UDP broadcast is often blocked by firewalls. Make sure the packets are getting through! Having fixed and/or worked around ALL of the above, and rebooted everything... I can now reliably use either multicast or subnet broadcast to connect with clients.
  11. 1 point
    Sounds like you've got problems with the library/drive. What make/model is it? I try to use Retrospect Client on the source servers rather than SMB-mounting them onto the Retrospect server since I find it generally works better -- an interrupted/resumed SMB session is usually handled fine during, say, a Finder copy but can be death to a backup. Otherwise, try the usual troubleshooting: how fast is a Retrospect Server to tape backup (i.e. eliminating SMB from the problem); how fast is a backup of SMB-mounted share to a disk directly attached to the Retro Server (i.e. eliminating the tape drive), and so on. For best speed you may want to look at a disk-to-disk-to-tape setup... As to overwriting tapes -- we don't do that here but, IIRC, that's what the "Recycle Media Set" media action (in the "Schedule" pane of the script definition) is for. Or have you tried that and found it doesn't work?
  12. 1 point
    Thanks a million Lennart. This worked - Recycled Disk and things are now backing up again!!!! 🙂 Not sure how I got the first one to back up without doing this, or why I wasnʻt told how to do this when I was told the disks need recycling. Iʻll keep a better eye on them now and do some grooming before they get so bad. Words canʻt express the gratitude I feel for your help from the other side of the world, when a company just down the road canʻt help me!!! Cheers and thanks bigtime!!!!
  13. 1 point
    lhlo (demerits for picking a cutesy-poo "handle" for which I can't figure out whether the first letter is upper-case 'I' or lower-case 'l'), First, read the boxed-in paragraph below the screenshot at the top of page 448 in the Retrospect Windows 9.5 User's Guide. If that paragraph describes what happens when your Member is full, un-check the checkbox and increase the "Use At Most" number of GB appropriately. Second, if that doesn't work, do what it says on pages 449-451 of the UG under "Adding a Disk to a Backup Set". Add the new Member on the same disk as existing Member, and give it the appropriate "Use At Most" number of GB. This post describes that as the workaround for an earlier version of Retrospect Windows. So this is your "poor second choice", but next time you'll remember to set the "Use At Most" percentage appropriately when adding all new Members.
  14. 1 point
    We could not bring the hard drive back to life. Lennart_T suggested to "Repair" the media set in Retrospect which I ran yesterday. Today I am happy to report the repair was the correct fix and I have a backup for the entire lab. Thank you Lennart_T Once we have the hard drive for the failed computer replaced it will be added to the backup schedule.
  15. 1 point
    x509 Do you have InstantScan running on the drives in question? I have encountered situations before where, although InstantScan is active and reports no detectable errors, the volume databases stops updating and so as far as Retrospect is concerned no new files have been added files have been added, changed, or deleted on the volume. When a file is added, changed or deleted the volume database should be updated fairly soon afterwards so if the file time stamp of the volume database is not updating then InstantScan is not updating. The InstantScan volume databases are in the C:\ProgramData\RetroISA\RetroISAScans folder. To reset stop the InstantScan services, delete the volume databases, the restart the InstantScan services.
  16. 1 point
    I am running Retrospect 15 and I'm having similar problems backing up a Windows 10 (Build 1803) laptop as a client. The client has 2 drives: C: (the OS) and Z: (a recovery partition). There are no issues backing up the host, which is a Windows 10 (Build 1803) desktop computer. No issues backing up 2 other clients that are Windows 7 computers. The first backup of the client laptop was working. It passed through the scan and was backing up files. However, I had to stop the backup midway for unrelated reasons. The next 2 attempts at a backup made it successfully through the scan for drive C: and some files were backed up. However, the -1103 error was thrown for the C: drive and the backup aborted. No issues at all backing up the Z: drive. All subsequent attempts for open file backup on the client resulted in the C: drive failing during the scan and no problems with the Z: drive. I confirmed VSS errors in the event log on the client at the same time as the -1103 errors. I can do a backup with "open files" disabled, although there are several warnings for sharing violations, which I assume would be expected. I have submitted a support ticket.
  17. 1 point
    Sure, I am the Backup, I don't see why not. The only possible glitch I can see is that what you can now purchase is Retrospect Mac 15; Retrospect Mac 14 is obsolete. The cumulative Release Notes for Retrospect Mac 15.0 say "New: Support for LTO-8 tape devices", so the chances are the support for LTO4 devices is still there. In case it isn't, I imagine you can go through Retrospect Sales to get a license code for Retrospect Mac 14.6, which can still be downloaded. The one thing I would caution you about is that the Desktop Edition only supports a single non-autoloader tape drive. If your LTO4 tape drive is fancy-shmancy, you may have to purchase the Single Workstation 20 Client Edition—which is substantially more expensive. You can probably negotiate this with Retrospect Sales, with whom I have no connection other than as a customer.
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