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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/21/2019 in Posts

  1. 1 point
    kidziti and everyone else, I had a telephone chat with the head of North America Sales for Retrospect "Inc." this morning (his time), in which I suggested just that. My suggestion, which he seems to like, is to simply actively market the Web-based Management Console in its no-extra-cost view-only form. You can get a brief view of the Retrospect 16.1 version of this facility in the first of these four interconnected videos. You can skip the second video (unless you want to learn how to sign up for the Management Console), and view the third video to see how to integrate the Management Console with a running Engine. The fourth video, which is designed for "Partners" (consulting organizations) shows additional two-way features available with the Add-On—which is US$49 for the Desktop Edition. The Retrospect 16.5 Add-On version of the Management Console moves the list of "backup servers" to a column on the left-hand side of the Dashboard window. Its Granular Remote Management also adds Activities and Sources and Backup Sets panels that the administrator can drill down to, as well as Scripts Management displays and the ability—for individual "backup servers"—to create and edit scripts and create destinations. Here's a 43-minute webinar that demonstrates the Retrospect Windows 16.5 version of Granular Remote Management—designed like the Retrospect Mac GUI. At minute 27 the head of Retrospect Tech Support recommends leaving Retrospect running all the time—using the Management Console. At minute 29 he says that they're moving towards having Retrospect run as a service with an HTML-based GUI. Is server column in non-Add-On Web Dashboard too? As the first video itself states, the Dashboard in the Management Console is basically an enhanced version of the non-Web-based Dashboard that kidziti and other Retrospect Windows administrators have a love/hate relationship with. That non-Web-based Dashboard is a poorly-implemented feature of Retrospect Windows. It was implemented in Retrospect Windows 8 because a Retrospect-Mac-like Console proved to be impossible, but had glaring bugs that weren't supposedly fixed until 4 years later in Retrospect Windows 12.5. See this 2017 Forums post by me, which quotes the applicable 12.5.0.177 Release Notes but also quotes a reply from Retrospect Tech Support. Also read the remainder of that thread.
  2. 1 point
    Interesting. I just finished discovering a specific set of bugs in Retrospect, and challenges in our router(s) and local network apps, that directly lead to the above anomalies in finding and/or connecting to clients. (Yes, all of the following has been submitted as a bug report.) I'm running a more Windows-centric network, with a little OSx tossed in, so my tools are a bit different. Tools: WireShark: shows packets actually traveling. Most useful is a filter of udp.port==497 || tcp.port==497 tcpdump (command line in linux and/or osx) - monitoring port 497 TCPview (from SysInternals, now owned by Microsoft) - sort on port. Look at what is listening to 497 and on what IP address(es) (command line) ipconfig and also "route print" In Retrospect: go into Clients -> choose a client-> access tab -> Interface -> Configure Interfaces ... and see what default interface IP address is. Things to watch for: Are UDP broadcast packets being received by clients? (eg 192.168.x.255, port 497) For multicast, are packets getting to clients? (eg 224.0.0.0/4 -- Retrospect uses 224.1.0.38 UDP port 497) Are clients responding to those packets (UDP broadcast or multicast) (initially to UDP port 497 on the backup system) If crossing subnets, is TTL set high enough to reach the client? What could possibly go wrong? Heh. Here are anomalies I've seen: Often, some app will create virtual interfaces. This includes npcap (for Wireshark etc), VMware, TAP-Windows (comes with Windows?), etc... This has led to: On some of my clients, some virtual interfaces have APIPA addresses (169.254.*) -- which makes it obvious when retrospect chooses the wrong interface to listen on! (Workaround: I uninstalled the TAP-Windows adapter as I don't need it. And I temporarily disabled npcap on the one workstation where that got in the way.) On my retrospect backup desktop, retrospect chose one of the VMware virtual adapters as the default adapter! This even though the real gig adapter has higher priority etc etc. (Workaround: create another adapter in Retrospect) The result in either case: I can't see the clients, even though ping works. I have a network security system. It regularly scans all ports on all subnets. Some (but not all) clients get confused by this, with the retroclient app hung up on an IP connection in CLOSE_WAIT status. The result: the client is never available for backups. Yet it is visible to subnet or multicast. We switched to a pfSense firewall/router. I just discovered that multicast forwarding is badly broken.(Workaround: manually installed pimd.) Similarly, UDP broadcast is often blocked by firewalls. Make sure the packets are getting through! Having fixed and/or worked around ALL of the above, and rebooted everything... I can now reliably use either multicast or subnet broadcast to connect with clients.
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