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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/11/2019 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Dashboard actually got me excited- a more friendly user interface! But it is dog-slow (okay - I LOVE dogs, but this thing is a Basset Hound in Greyhound race.) It often hangs, gobbles resources, hangs again when trying to simply scroll, and ultimately gives little useful information. It's everything short of what we've come to expect from Retrospect - a lean, efficient, business-like and functional application. When Retrospect is invoked by a scheduled script, dashboard is the only option that comes up when you want to monitor the program itself - and the fact that there is no escape from dashboard only adds to the frustration. I get that it is well-intended - but it was executed poorly and ends up detracting from the program. I'm in the trial period (Windows 16.5) and likely will invest in Retrospect based on the last ten years of functionality and reliability with 7.7. The dashboard is the single biggest negative in my pluses and minuses column as I decide on making the purchase. Just my opinion here, but instead of the dashboard, might I suggest this approach: Develop a user interface that finally leaves the '90's behind. It would probably meet dashboard's intent with more digital elegance. Add a tray monitor - something we can mouse over and see the basics, or open and get more detail. Perhaps that goes to knowing your customers. Face it - this is a techie's software that requires a greater learning curve than the prettier faces like Cloudberry. I could be mistaken, but I suspect most Retrospect users (certainly me) would appreciate a backup solution that provides ease of both interface and access - and a tray monitor would be a simple, performance-oriented way to do just that.
  2. 1 point
    Kidziti, You raise a whole bunch of points in your post. Retrospect, or any other product in its class, is not just a point-in-time purchase. You also need to "invest" in learning the product (non-trivial) and doing configuration and tuning. You also want to be sure that your investment is protected long-term because of the financial strength of the vendor. I don't know much about Storcentric (or its competition) but I will observe that backup is a relatively mature market category. One could argue that web-based backup is a different market segment than more traditional premises-based backup, but I will leave that argument to others. And what is Storecentric's strategy in purchasing Retrosepct and Drobo, as opposed to any of their direct competitors, I simply don't know. That is an issue for Storcentric of course, but it's also the kind of issue that is catnip for product management types like me. However, on the more narrow decision to purchase an ASM. I have found that I can get quite good support for my issues, even though I have not purchased an ASM. of course, when release 17 comes out, then I will have to pony up for the upgrade. More generally you have to decide if Retrospect, as it exists today, meets your needs better than the competition. Salespeople are supposed to "SWAT," Sell What's Available Today. I would ignore the statement about a new release next March, because the reality of software development is that March can easily become May or July or September. And unless you know what is in that release, you don't know how important that release is for you with capabilities that you need now, but are not in the current release. Whatever you do, DO NOT buy shares in Storcentric. There is not much information on the website, certainly not who/what is funding this acquisition strategy. https://storcentric.com/
  3. 1 point
    FYI: You can delete the snapshots one by one. But it takes lots of time and Retrospect is "not responding" for a looong time for each snapshot.
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